Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Researchers discover how soils control atmospheric hydrogen


Researchers at New Zealand's University of Otago are helping to clear up an enduring mystery regarding the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. They have discovered the microbial soil processes that help ensure that the explosive gas hydrogen remains at trace levels.

In recent decades it was found that around four-fifths of all hydrogen released into the air is rapidly removed through soil activity, but exactly what is recycling it, and how, has remained unclear.

Now, Otago scientists have shown that the soil bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis uses two special enzymes that can efficiently scavenge hydrogen as fuel at very low concentrations. They also found the bacterium ramps up these enzymes' activity when starved of its usual carbon-based energy sources.

The Department of Microbiology & Immunology researchers' findings appear in the prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Their discovery has implications for improved understanding of global climate processes and for developing new catalysts for hydrogen fuel cells.

Study lead author and Otago PhD candidate Chris Greening says the findings emerge from a project led by Professor Greg Cook investigating why the mycobacteria family, which includes members causing TB and leprosy, have genes encoding hydrogenase enzymes. Hydrogenases are well-known for their roles in anaerobic bacteria, but this is the first comprehensive study of these enzymes in an organism that requires oxygen to combust their fuel sources.

"Hydrogen scavenging is just one example of the ingenuity of microorganisms. Bacterial metabolism is much more flexible than that of humans. While we rely on carbon sources such as sugars and amino acids, many bacteria can use gases (e.g. hydrogen, carbon monoxide) and even metals (e.g. iron, uranium) as fuel sources for growth and survival," says Mr Greening.

It now appears that M. smegmatis and several other species of soil actinobacteria are demonstrating a metabolic flexibility that would provide a powerful advantage over other aerobic microbes in soil ecosystems, he says.

"High-affinity hydrogenases allow these bacteria to harness hydrogen to survive on when their standard carbon-based fuel sources are absent. While hydrogen is at low concentrations in the air, it is essentially a constant and unlimited resource. This means that bacteria scavenging this highly dependable fuel source would be especially competitive against other organisms in their volatile environments."

On a global scale, this activity leads to soil actinobacteria serving as the main sink for atmospheric hydrogen. This in turn influences the concentrations of other gases in the atmosphere, including potent greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide, he says.

Mr Greening says that hydrogenases have additionally attracted interest from researchers working to make dependable, inexpensive hydrogen fuel cells a reality. "Developing a catalyst that mimics the high-affinity, oxygen-tolerant action of the hydrogenases in M. smegmatis would provide an enormous boost for this technology," he says.

Originally from the UK, Mr Greening joined Professor Cook's laboratory in November 2010 after completing a Bachelor's and Master's degree in Biochemistry at the University of Oxford. He will shortly complete his doctoral studies at Otago to take up a position researching drug targets for TB at CSIRO, Australia's national science agency.

"I decided to come here to do my PhD under Professor Cook after attending a research presentation he gave at Oxford." Having been awarded a first class degree at Oxford, Mr Greening pretty much had the choice of any world-leading institution to continue his studies. However, he says "Greg's multifaceted science captured my imagination so strongly that I set my sights on Otago."


The team's project was supported by a Marsden Fund Grant awarded to Professor Cook and study co-author Dr Michael Berney. The other co-authors include Kiel Hards, who studied the hydrogenases during his BSc Honours year, and Professor Dr Ralf Conrad, director of the Max-Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, Germany.

Chris Greening | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: Greening actinobacteria activity bacteria bacterium concentrations enzymes gases soils

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Taking a molecular approach to conserving freshwater biodiversity
09.11.2015 | Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)

nachricht Faster digestion in kangaroos reduces methane emissions
05.11.2015 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaics – from the Lab to the Façade

Fraunhofer ISE Demonstrates New Cell and Module Technologies on its Outer Building Façade

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE has installed 70 photovoltaic modules on the outer façade of one of its lab buildings. The modules were...

Im Focus: Lactate for Brain Energy

Nerve cells cover their high energy demand with glucose and lactate. Scientists of the University of Zurich now provide new support for this. They show for the first time in the intact mouse brain evidence for an exchange of lactate between different brain cells. With this study they were able to confirm a 20-year old hypothesis.

In comparison to other organs, the human brain has the highest energy requirements. The supply of energy for nerve cells and the particular role of lactic acid...

Im Focus: Laser process simulation available as app for first time

In laser material processing, the simulation of processes has made great strides over the past few years. Today, the software can predict relatively well what will happen on the workpiece. Unfortunately, it is also highly complex and requires a lot of computing time. Thanks to clever simplification, experts from Fraunhofer ILT are now able to offer the first-ever simulation software that calculates processes in real time and also runs on tablet computers and smartphones. The fast software enables users to do without expensive experiments and to find optimum process parameters even more effectively.

Before now, the reliable simulation of laser processes was a job for experts. Armed with sophisticated software packages and after many hours on computer...

Im Focus: Quantum Simulation: A Better Understanding of Magnetism

Heidelberg physicists use ultracold atoms to imitate the behaviour of electrons in a solid

Researchers at Heidelberg University have devised a new way to study the phenomenon of magnetism. Using ultracold atoms at near absolute zero, they prepared a...

Im Focus: Climate Change: Warm water is mixing up life in the Arctic

AWI researchers’ unique 15-year observation series reveals how sensitive marine ecosystems in polar regions are to change

The warming of arctic waters in the wake of climate change is likely to produce radical changes in the marine habitats of the High North. This is indicated by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

Fraunhofer’s Urban Futures Conference: 2 days in the city of the future

25.11.2015 | Event News

Gluten oder nicht Gluten? Überempfindlichkeit auf Weizen kann unterschiedliche Ursachen haben

17.11.2015 | Event News

Art Collection Deutsche Börse zeigt Ausstellung „Traces of Disorder“

21.10.2015 | Event News

Latest News

Harnessing a peptide holds promise for increasing crop yields without more fertilizer

25.11.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

Earth's magnetic field is not about to flip

25.11.2015 | Earth Sciences

Tracking down the 'missing' carbon from the Martian atmosphere

25.11.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>