Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Excess diesel emissions bring global health & environmental impacts

16.05.2017

Excess NOx emissions from diesel engines have been linked to approximately 38,000 premature deaths worldwide in 2015—mostly in the European Union, China, and India.

Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from diesel cars, trucks, and buses are a major contributor to air pollution-related deaths worldwide—and the impacts are increasing, despite regulatory limits. Since 2015, revelations that Volkswagen and other manufacturers used “defeat devices” to hide from regulators the fact that their diesel cars were emitting too much NOx helped to heighten public awareness of the problem. But this is not just a defeat device problem.


Annual premature deaths attributable to diesel vehicle NOx emissions, 2015

Anenberg et al 2017

Both light-duty and heavy-duty diesel vehicles emit more NOx in on-road driving conditions than during laboratory certification testing, for reasons that may range from details of the engine calibration to equipment failure, inadequate maintenance, tampering by vehicle owners, the deliberate use of defeat devices, or simply deficient certification test procedures.

Solid quantitative data about the effects of diesel vehicle excess NOx emissions, both in terms of public health and environmental impacts, have been lacking—until now. A study published today in Nature examined 11 major vehicle markets representing more than 80% of new diesel vehicle sales in 2015 (Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, the EU, India, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Korea, and the USA) and found that those vehicles emitted 13.2 million tons of NOx under real-world driving conditions—that’s 4.6 million tons more than the 8.6 million tons expected given the vehicles’ performance under official laboratory tests.

“Heavy-duty vehicles—commercial trucks and buses—were by far the largest contributor worldwide, accounting for 76% of the total excess NOx emissions. And just five markets (Brazil, China, the EU, India, and the USA) produced 90% of that. For light-duty vehicles—passenger cars, trucks, and vans—the European Union produced nearly 70% of the excess diesel NOx emissions,” says Josh Miller, researcher at the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) and co-lead author of the study.

IIASA researchers Zbigniew Klimont and Chris Heyes contributed data on global NOx emissions to the study, from the IIASA Greenhouse gas - Air pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) model.

“While globally, the on-road diesel vehicles contribute over 20% of total NOx emissions, in several regions their share is much larger--in the EU this exceeds 40%, nearly half of which is due to poor enforcement of existing standards. This level of emissions could also threaten the achievement of other environmental targets, which assume compliance with stricter emissions standards,” says Klimont.

NOx is a key contributor to outdoor air pollution in the forms of ground-level ozone and secondary fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Long-term exposure to these pollutants is linked to a range of adverse health outcomes, including disability and years of life lost due to stroke, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer—particularly in sensitive populations such as the elderly, who are at higher risk of chronic disease. The study combined results from in-use vehicle emissions testing studies with global atmospheric modeling, satellite observations, and health, crop yield, and climate models to estimate the damages caused by diesel NOx emissions.

The study estimates that excess diesel vehicle NOx emissions in 2015 were linked to ~38,000 premature deaths worldwide—mostly in the European Union, China, and India. “The consequences of excess diesel NOx emissions for public health are striking,” says Susan Anenberg, co-lead author of the study and cofounder of Environmental Health Analytics, LLC. “In Europe, the ozone mortality burden each year would be 10% lower if diesel vehicle NOx emissions were in line with certification limits.”

At a global level, the study projects that the impact of all real-world diesel NOx emissions will grow to 183,600 early deaths in 2040, unless governments act. In some countries, implementing the most stringent standards—already in place elsewhere—could substantially improve the situation, according to the researchers. “Globally, the single most important action to reduce the health impacts of excess diesel NOx emissions is for countries to implement and properly enforce a Euro VI tailpipe emission standard for heavy-duty vehicles. Combined with strengthened compliance for light-duty vehicles and next-generation standards, this would nearly eliminate real-world NOx emissions from diesel vehicles, which would avoid 174,000 air pollution-related deaths and 3 million years of life lost worldwide in the year 2040,” says Ray Minjares, co-author and Clean Air Program Lead at ICCT.

KEY FINDINGS:
• Increased air pollution from diesel NOx emissions caused 107,600 early deaths worldwide in 2015; 38,000 of these deaths are attributable to “excess NOx emissions”—emissions under real-world driving conditions compared with emissions under official laboratory tests. Approximately 80% of these deaths (for both excess NOx and total diesel NOx) occurred in three regions—the EU, China, and India. By comparison, in 2015 about 35,000 people died from road accidents in the US, and about 26,000 in the EU.
• China suffered the largest health burden of diesel NOx emissions (31,400 deaths, of which 10,700 are attributed to excess NOx), followed by the EU (28,500 total; 11,500 excess) and India (26,700 total; 9,400 excess).
• Light-duty diesel vehicles in the EU accounted for 6 out of every 10 deaths related to excess diesel NOx.
• An estimated 1,100 deaths from excess diesel NOx occurred in the United States in 2015, where heavy-duty diesel vehicles caused 10 times the impact of light-duty diesel cars.
• Laboratory-certified vehicles met mandatory emission limits but in the real world produced 2.3 times NOx emission limits for light-duty diesel vehicles and 1.45 times limits for heavy-duty diesel vehicles, on average.

The study was led by the International Council on Clean Transportation and Environmental Health Analytics, LLC., in collaboration with the University of Colorado, Stockholm Environment Institute, and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. Funding for the study was provided by the Hewlett Foundation, ClimateWorks Foundation, European Climate Foundation, Energy Foundation China, and the NASA Health and Air Quality Applied System Team.

Reference
Anenberg S, Miller J, Minjares R, Du L, Henze D, Lacey F, Malley C, Emberson L, Franco V, Klimont Z, and Heyes C (2017). Impacts and mitigation of excess diesel NOx emissions in 11 major vehicle markets. Nature 15 May 2017.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.iiasa.ac.at/web/home/research/researchPrograms/air/GAINS.en.html
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/web/home/about/achievements/scientificachievementsandpoli...

Katherine Leitzell | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: IIASA NOx environmental impacts global health vehicles

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?
19.02.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hoped
08.02.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductor

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Reconstructing what makes us tick

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materials

25.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>