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Siemens supplies the world's biggest gearless conveyor drive system

06.10.2015
  • Gearless drive technology enables the use of a conveyor belt system in Peru with a total installed power of 12,000 kilowatts
  • Extreme availability due to low wear and reduced maintenance
  • Three percent increase in efficiency over conventional drive systems

Siemens supplies the world's biggest gearless conveyor drive system to the Cuajone Mine in Peru which is operated by the Mexican mining company Southern Copper Corporation (SCC). The modernization project will entail the installation of a new gyratory crushing and conveyor system by 2016.

The belt conveyor will replace a railway system currently used to transport the ore out of the mine to the processing plant. The Integrated Drive System (IDS) used to power the world's highest-powered gearless conveyor system with an output totaling 12,000 kilowatts is being supplied by Siemens.

Not only does the gearless drive enable efficiency to be increased by three percent, it also cuts down the necessary maintenance work and associated costs, as wearing parts such as couplings, motor bearings and gearboxes are no longer required.

In mid-2014, Siemens was chosen by ThyssenKrupp to supply the electrical package to the Cuajone Mine in Peru with a contract valued in the double-digit million Euro range. Previously, the ore was transported out of the mine for further processing using a train over a distance of more than six kilometers to the processing plant. The existing railway is now being replaced by an efficient conveyor belt system and a gyratory crusher, for which Siemens is providing the automation system, the power distribution equipment, and the drive system. Alongside conventional drives, Siemens is deploying primarily Integrated Drive Systems (IDS) with gearless drives which offer a high level of availability by dispensing with many of the wear-prone components such as gearboxes, couplings and motor bearings. Gearless drives also enable the use of a continuous conveyor belt, eliminating the need for transfer stations and so reducing susceptibility to faults, cutting out the need for high-intensity maintenance and driving down costs.

The conveyor belt system comprises three individual sections which are equipped by a total of five Integrated Drive Systems. For the largest of the belt sections, Siemens is supplying two gearless drive systems with an output of 6,000 kilowatts each, comprising a low speed synchronous motor and a Sinamics SL150 cycloconverter. The two smaller feed and discharge belts will be driven by two 500 kilowatt low-voltage motors using Sinamics S150 inverters with regenerative feedback capability and one 1200 kilowatt medium-voltage motor. The converters and motors as well as the gearboxes and couplings for these drives are all supplied by Siemens. The automation components as well as the drive and power distribution technology are provided in modular electrical rooms (E-houses).

Siemens is no stranger to the Cuajone Mine facility, where it supplied a drive system for a HPGR (high-pressure grinding roll) system back in 2013. SCC operates mines and metal processing factories in Peru, US and Mexico, including the Toquepala and the Cuajone copper mines in Southern Peru. The company mines and produces copper, molybdenum, selenium, gold and silver and also invests in the exploration and harnessing of mineral deposits in Peru, Mexico and Chile.

Further information about mining at www.siemens.com/mining


Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a major provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions as well as automation, drive and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading provider of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2014, which ended on September 30, 2014, Siemens generated revenue from continuing operations of €71.9 billion and net income of €5.5 billion. At the end of September 2014, the company had around 343,000 employees worldwide on a continuing basis.

Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.com


Reference Number: PR2015100013PDEN


Contact
Mr. Stefan Rauscher
Process Industries and Drives Division


Siemens AG

Gleiwitzer Str. 555

90475 Nuremberg

Germany

Tel: +49 (911) 895-7952

Stefan.Rauscher​@siemens.com

Stefan Rauscher | Siemens Process Industries and Drives

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