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New side guide system from Siemens extends service life by up to ten times

16.12.2014

• The Eco Slide Disc system is significantly reducing maintenance costs in the down coiler area of hot strip mills

• No wear plate replacement during production

• Improved strip guidance and elimination of strip surface defects caused by the down coiler entry guides

• Up to 75 percent cost savings for operational wear parts

• Very short payback time

With the newly developed Eco Slide Disc Solution, Siemens Metals Technologies offers operators of hot strip mills a side guide system which can be adapted to nearly all existing entry guides and elongates the lifetime of wear parts up to 10 times compared to conventional wear plates.


Eco Slide Disks in the hot rolling mill of voestalpine Stahl GmbH in Linz, Austria. At the time the photograph was taken, the disks had been in continuous operation for 14 days. During that time, 3,638 coils with a total length of more than 2,800 kilometers were wound.

The core of the solution consists of wearing discs which are integrated into the entry side guides. After the wear limit has been reached, the discs can be simultaneously round up to eight times, every time offering a new sliding surface. Furthermore, the discs can be turned over to their back face to be used on both sides.

This optimizes strip guidance eliminates personnel-intensive replacement processes in the safety zone and reduces the costs of operational wear parts by up to 75 percent. The system can pay for itself within one to two years. The Eco Slide Discs are successfully in continuous use at voestalpine Stahl GmbH in Linz, Austria, since August 2014.

Guiding hot strip during the coiling process into marketable coils results in high wear of the down coiler entry side guides. This requires a frequent replacement of the wear plates, sometimes daily, leading to high operational, maintenance and stockpiling costs. In most cases, the changeover is done during the short work roll changing break which takes about ten minutes.

The turnable modules of the Eco Slide Disc system are featuring a robust and maintenance-free design, enabling simultaneous rotation of the wear disks during production. The consequent improvement in strip guidance reduces the risk of damage to the strip edges and additionally substantially increases the life cycle of the wear parts. The risk of strip surface defects due to burning burrs falling off the wear plates can be reduced by continuous rotation of the sliding discs. The exchange of worn out discs can be executed during a maintenance shift, which usually takes place every one to two weeks. There is no need for the repair welding and grinding work performed by many operators on the expensive wearing plates.

The Metals Technologies Business Unit, based in Linz, Austria, is one of the world's leading lifecycle partners for the metallurgical industry. The Business Unit offers a comprehensive portfolio of technologies, modernization solutions, products and services, as well as integrated automation and environmental solutions for entire plant lifecycles.

Guiding hot strip during the coiling process into marketable coils results in high wear of the down coiler entry side guides. This requires a frequent replacement of the wear plates, sometimes daily, leading to high operational, maintenance and stockpiling costs. In most cases, the changeover is done during the short work roll changing break which takes about ten minutes.

The turnable modules of the Eco Slide Disc system are featuring a robust and maintenance-free design, enabling simultaneous rotation of the wear disks during production. The consequent improvement in strip guidance reduces the risk of damage to the strip edges and additionally substantially increases the life cycle of the wear parts. The risk of strip surface defects due to burning burrs falling off the wear plates can be reduced by continuous rotation of the sliding discs. The exchange of worn out discs can be executed during a maintenance shift, which usually takes place every one to two weeks. There is no need for the repair welding and grinding work performed by many operators on the expensive wearing plates.

The Metals Technologies Business Unit, based in Linz, Austria, is one of the world's leading lifecycle partners for the metallurgical industry. The Business Unit offers a comprehensive portfolio of technologies, modernization solutions, products and services, as well as integrated automation and environmental solutions for entire plant lifecycles.

For further information on solutions for steelworks, rolling mills and processing lines, please see www.siemens.com/metals

 

Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a leading provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions and automation and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading supplier of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2013, which ended on September 30, 2013, revenue from continuing operations totaled €75.9 billion and income from continuing operations €4.2 billion. At the end of September 2013, Siemens had around 362,000 employees worldwide on the basis of continuing operations. Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.com.

Reference Number: PR2014120083PDEN

For further information on solutions for steelworks, rolling mills and processing lines, please see www.siemens.com/metals

Contact

Mr. Rainer Schulze
Process Industries and Drives Division

Siemens AG

Turmstr. 44

4031  Linz

Austria

Tel: +49 (9131) 7-44544

Rainer Schulze | Siemens Process Industries and Drives

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