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Highest measurement speed and flexibility due to automated ultrasonic testing

03.06.2016

The Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS develops application-specific solutions for ultrasonic testing. The systems of PCUS® pro family range from simple manual testing to fully automated ultrasonic testing. At the World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (WCNDT) researchers of Fraunhofer IKTS present the new development PCUS® pro Array II, which is optimized for fast automated testing in metal processing as well as in the fields of railway and automotive, power plant or wind power technology.

PCUS® pro is the ultrasonic platform developed at Fraunhofer IKTS. For years, it has been known for highest reliability, high test speed and adaptability to respective test tasks. The systems allow for non-destructive testing by conventional ultrasonic methods as well as by phased-array methods during production, maintenance or in the test laboratory.


The new development PCUS® pro Array II for particularly fast phased-array inspections with many elements.

© Fraunhofer IKTS

The ultrasonic front-end PCUS® pro Array II extends the product range by a compact and fast phased-array device with up to 128 (128:128) native channels. IKTS scientist Christian Richter points out other advantages of the system:

“By cascading multiple devices, even larger apertures can be controlled. Highest scanning rates are achieved due to the completely parallel design and the USB 3.0 interface. To ensure maximum reliability, the PCUS® pro Array II front-end is equipped with a multitude of diagnostic and self-test capabilities.“

The area of ​​application of the new test system ranges from phased-array inspections of welds, to complex test tasks with multiple array probes, such as the testing of solid axles in cargo trains, up to medical applications, such as small animal ultrasound and high-resolution brain scans. The freely configurable software and hardware combination also allows for tests with many conventional probes, for example in the inline sheet inspection.

All PCUS® pro devices developed at Fraunhofer IKTS are compact, energy-efficient and meet the relevant parts of the ultrasound standard DIN EN 12668. The modular structure allows for adaptation to the specific test task with little development effort. All front-ends are equipped with a USB interface for easy connection, also of multiple devices, to any Windows PC, laptop or tablet.

Another highlight is the PCUS® Pocket: an entire ultrasonic device for your pocket. PCUS® Pocket completes the successful PCUS® family in the age of industry 4.0. The ultrasonic test device “to go“ is controlled by smartphone or tablet but can also be easily connected to a laptop or PC via the USB port.

At booth FE57, scientists of Fraunhofer IKTS present the PCUS® systems for ultrasonic testing.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ikts.fraunhofer.de/en/communication/press_media/press_releases/2016_0...

Katrin Schwarz | Fraunhofer-Institut für Keramische Technologien und Systeme IKTS

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