Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Superconducting material limits short-circuit currents

19.02.2015

Siemens develops superconducting fault current limiters for limiting short-circuit currents in the grid.

Superconductors show zero resistance below the critical temperature and below the critical current. They are thus more energy efficient than conventional series reactors.

Despite the fact that superconducting components require cooling, the technology can help to reduce the power losses by half compared to the losses caused by currently usedseries reactors. Siemens will test the new superconducting fault current limiter in cooperation with the Augsburg municipal utility company and install a prototype in the grid by the end of 2015.

With the increase of renewable energy production, more and more biogas and solar facilities and wind farms are feeding energy directly into the medium-voltage power grid. Short circuits could thus cause high currents and require the installation of protective components. Series reactors alone, which damp short-circuit currents like a resistor, would not offer a solution.

They not only act as resistors when there is a short circuit, but also during normal operation. This causes electricity to be continuously wasted. The power loss typically amounts to 25 kilowatts per series reactor coil. Experts estimate that up to 44,000 series reactors are installed worldwide. That translates into a global power loss of up to 1,100 megawatts, which is the equivalent of a large power plant's output.

No resistance at minus 196 degrees

Superconductors solve that issue, because they can transport electricity with no resistance and almost no loss at low temperatures and below the critical current. They are in some sense "invisible" in the grid. The scientists at Siemens Corporate Technology have been researching high-temperature superconductors for more than 20 years now and have several key patents for resistive superconducting fault current limiters.

The scientists are using ceramic high-temperature superconductors made of yttrium-barium copper oxide, which are cooled down to minus 196 degrees Celsius with liquid nitrogen. If a short circuit occurs, the current increases strongly, and when reaching the critical current value of the superconductor, it will cause the superconductor to lose its superconducting properties and suddenly turn into a resistor.

The superconducting current limiter prototype will be combined with a series reactor, through which the short-circuit current will then be rerouted. That way the superconductor can cool off so that it will automatically be usable again a short time later.

In Augsburg, the current limiter will be installed between the grid of the Augsburg municipal utility company and a facility operated by MTU onsite energy. MTU manufactures cogeneration plants. While testing these, MTU feeds the produced electricity into the Augsburg grid.

The tests sometimes achieve peak outputs of 15 megawatts. Siemens plans to monitor the new technology for about one year, but both partners aim for a permanent installation even after the formal duration of the project. The cooperation project receives support from the Bavarian Ministry of Economics.

Press Picture: http://www.siemens.com/press/en/presspicture/?press=/en/presspicture/innovationn...

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.siemenscom/innovationnews

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht ISFH-CalTeC is “designated test centre” for the confirmation of solar cell world records
16.01.2018 | Institut für Solarenergieforschung GmbH

nachricht A water-based, rechargeable battery
09.01.2018 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

White graphene makes ceramics multifunctional

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Breaking bad metals with neutrons

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

ISFH-CalTeC is “designated test centre” for the confirmation of solar cell world records

16.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>