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Sensor systems for Industry 4.0

25.03.2015

Bending, drawing, rolling, pressing – there are many ways of shaping sheet metal. But all methods have one thing in common: enormous forces and fluctuating temperatures often result in flaws in the sheets. To prevent this and to boost the efficiency of the process, sensor systems are being developed at the Fraunhofer IST which measure forces and temperatures during the forming process.

In optimizing production processes it is very important to generate measurement data at locations where measuring systems can only be integrated with difficulty, such as, for example, in direct contact between workpiece and tool.


Strip metal drawing die with full thin film sensor system

© Fraunhofer IST

The Fraunhofer IST is developing thin film sensors with which manufacturing can be monitored in the main stress zones, directly on the tools. The new sensorized coating systems are multi­sensoric – in other words, they contain not only piezoresistive but also thermoresistive sensor structures embedded in the wear-protection layers.

It is thus possible for the first time to measure stresses and temperatures simultaneously and with spatial resolution. With these measurement results production processes can be optimized so that, for example, cracks and creasing during the deep-drawing of sheet metal can be minimized or plastic injection-molding processes can even be improved with respect to cycle times.

It is precisely in the age of Industry 4.0 that this further development of integrated sensor technology is gaining enormously in importance. The dominant topic in the production landscape of Europe, especially in Germany, is a qualitative, quantitative, flexible and at the same time resource-efficient production.

The basis for this development is a very good understanding of the production processes on the basis of human experience and measurement results. “This is where we start with our thin-film sensors in supplying the important data needed for simulations”, says Dr. Saskia Biehl, head of the “Micro and sensor technology” group at the Fraunhofer IST.

At the Fraunhofer Adaptronics Alliance joint booth (C22) in Hall 2 the Fraunhofer IST presents the new multisensoric coating systems.

About the project
The results we have described were obtained within the SensoFut project (Sensorized Future – Sensing of temperature and pressure in harsh environments), on which the Fraunhofer IST worked together with the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU and Sirris, the Belgian research association. SensoFut is funded in the 13th Cornet Call (Collective Research Networking) by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWI) and the German Federation of Industrial Research Associations (AiF) and runs until June 30, 2015.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ist.fraunhofer.de

Dr. Simone Kondruweit | Fraunhofer-Institut für Schicht- und Oberflächentechnik IST

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