Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Standby is a waste of time and energy

04.10.2007
Consumers are repeatedly warned that leaving their electrical devices in standby mode wastes large amounts of energy and makes a significant contribution to carbon dioxide emissions. And therefore regulations are needed, which urge manufactures of electronic devices to cut down standby energy power, right?

Wrong! According to results of a study published today in the International Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development, there is little point in forcing further reduction of standby power. As electrical devices get more and more efficient, the amount of energy saved through stricter regulation becomes ever smaller and efforts would be better placed improving the overall efficiency of devices in operation.

Hendrik Biebeler and colleagues at the Cologne Institute for Economic Research suggests that the European Union directive aimed at reducing the negative environmental impact of technology by attempting to regulate the off switch is at best misguided when it comes to such devices and at worst likely to lead to avoidance by manufacturers in terms of improving the energy efficiency of their products in other ways.

"Our impact assessment demonstrates that the off mode and real standby of a TFT computer monitor and of LCD television sets only have a small potential to reduce energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions," say the researchers. They point out that regulating the off mode is the most expensive option that saves the least amount of energy when it comes to producing more environmentally friendly electrical devices.

The researchers suggest that regulation of standby energy consumption focuses on only a limited fraction of the total potential to increase energy efficiency by developing devices that are more efficient while in use. More of us are replacing old personal computers that had separate energy-guzzling cathode-ray monitors with TFT monitors and laptops. A TFT monitor uses a third of the energy (25 Watts) of standard cathode ray monitors (75 Watts), but the difference between standby and off mode for a TFT monitor is around one watt.

Gradual phasing out of old energy-intensive components should, the researchers say, be a priority rather than the regulators being concerned with the loss of the small fraction of energy wasted in leaving a device inactive in standby rather than switched off at the mains.

They point out that manufacturers will endeavour to comply with whatever regulations are in place at as low a cost as possible. If the regulations insist on enforced off mode systems, then they will adopt that, but that will save far less energy overall than enforcing greater energy efficiency in device operation.

Jim Corlett | alfa
Further information:
http://www.inderscience.com

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cell with 21.9 % Efficiency: Fraunhofer ISE Again Holds World Record
20.02.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

nachricht Six-legged robots faster than nature-inspired gait
17.02.2017 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>