Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New wind energy predictions save millions

11.01.2006


Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, The Danish Meteorological Institute, Elsam and Energi E2 in Denmark have jointly developed a new method for predicting the energy produced by wind turbines. The method will save millions for electricity producers and consumers



In Denmark more than 5,000 wind turbines produce an average of more than 20 per cent of the Danish power consumption.

The electric utilities must supplement wind energy production with power from the liberalised electricity market. If they buy too much they have to sell the surplus power cheaply, and if they buy too little they have to buy extra at additional cost. It is thus extremely important to know precisely the volume of power, which the turbines are expected to generate, preferably a number of days ahead.


For more than ten years, scientists from Risø and from the Department of Informatics and Mathematical Modelling (IMM) at the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, have provided wind energy predictions to the electric utilities 48 hours ahead. These predictions have been based on meteorological data from the Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, and local conditions. A new class of models is now also able to predict the uncertainty of the prediction up to a week ahead. The uncertainties are calculated by including predictions from many meteorological models or model runs, a so-called ensemble of meteorological models. The new models are thus able to predict the amount of the energy production in the coming week at a certain location, e.g., a wind farm or an entire region, and make an uncertainty estimate for that particular prediction.

The models for predicting wind energy are primarily supplied to electricity utilities which in this way know how much power they need to purchase on the liberalised electricity market in order to meet demand and ensure a stable power supply.

“The models allow the electricity utilities to save money”, says Gregor Giebel, Senior Scientist at Risø. “In Denmark, the electricity utilities must typically trade power for the next 24 hours by 12 noon the previous day. With a certain prognosis, the utilities are able to plan optimally and if it is uncertain, they need to have costly backup reserves.” However, Gregor Giebel points out that this is a financial game which will not result in the consumers being without power. Conversely, good prognoses help reduce the electricity price and the risk of power outages. Moreover, the new prognoses can be used to predict fuel consumption at power plants, or to decide when to disconnect a unit from the system for maintenance.

Gregor Giebel | alfa
Further information:
http://www.risoe.dk
http://www.risoe.dk/rispubl/VEA/ris-r-1527.htm) or read more at http://www.risoe.dk/zephyr/

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Waste from paper and pulp industry supplies raw material for development of new redox flow batteries
12.10.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

nachricht Low-cost battery from waste graphite
11.10.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study suggests oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollution

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

17.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>