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Did you know what a Christmas village has to do with UV radiation?

01.12.2017

A Christmas theme park in Scandinavia opens its doors to many visitors every year during Christmas season. Featured attractions include an ice gallery, where you can admire various animals carved out of ice. During the rest of the year, the premises are closed.


Due to the damp and wet rooms, mold spores and unpleasant odors are very often formed. Special UV lamps from Heraeus Noblelight can help to combat this problem.

The physical method of UV radiation is an economical and environmentally friendly alternative to chemical processes. By using special Heraeus UV lamps, ozone is generated from the atmospheric oxygen of the ambient air. For this purpose, the emitted radiation of wavelength 185 nm is used. The radiation at the longer wavelength of 254nm photolyzes the ozone into excited oxygen, which oxidizes the long chain molecules. That way, mold can be killed and unpleasant mold odors are broken down.

The ultraviolet radiation covers the wavelength range from 100 to 380 nm. The disinfection with UV low- pressure lamps uses the wavelength in the UVC range of 254 nm, the ozone production the wavelength 185 nm.

Click here to find out more about the UV oxidation process.

Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Heraeusstr. 12-14
D-63450 Hanau

Phone +49 6181 35 8547
Fax +49 6181 35 16 8547
E-Mail: hng-info@heraeus.com

www.heraeus.com

Juliane Henze | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

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