Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

RV Polarstern Starts the Arctic Season

13.06.2016

New equipment for the AWI-"Gardener": Expansion of the deep-sea long-term observatory AWI-Hausgarten

Scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) are setting out with the research vessel Polarstern towards Spitsbergen, to use newly developed equipment in the Arctic Ocean.


Recovery of PAUL after the under-ice dive.

Photo: Alfred-Wegener-Institut / Mascha Wurst

Autonomous instruments on the seabed, in the water column and in the air will complement the long-term measurements of the deep-sea research group. In this way researchers can analyse the climatic changes in the Arctic and their impact on the fauna in the future with higher temporal and spatial resolution.

For the first time the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) "Tramper" will be set on its own for a year on the Arctic seabed. "The newly developed device is to measure oxygen along the depth gradients on a weekly basis. In this way we want to quantify how the sediment-dwelling marine organisms remineralize the biomass on the sea floor," explains Dr Thomas Soltwedel, deep-sea ecologist at the AWI and chief scientist of the expedition.

The scientists want to close a knowledge gap: How are climate-induced changes in the productivity by algae on the water surface as well as in and under the sea ice temporally coupled to the export of nutrients in the deep-sea? And how are the deep-water organisms reacting to the presumably strong variability in food availability?

Above the Tramper working on the deep-sea floor, a further mobile measuring instrument is to be used: The autonomous underwater vehicle AUV named PAUL floats on a pre-programmed course through the water column, takes samples and simultaneously detects a wide range of environmental factors.

Equipped as a small laboratory, PAUL measures the water temperature, salinity, the concentration of nitrate, chlorophyll a and oxygen, as well as various organic substances and the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation. Additionally, PAUL collects water samples, from which the scientists can filter and determine the micro-organisms of plankton. Using an additional built-in acoustic Doppler current metre (ADCP), the physical properties along the melt-water border on the edge of the ice of the Arctic Ocean are to be investigated.

In order to exactly understand the ice conditions above the profile of PAUL, they will use autonomous flying devices. The so-called UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) records the thickness of the snow cover in addition to the ice coverage. For example, it can then be determined to what extent sunlight as energy reaches the ocean under the ice. One of the UAV places GPS transmitters on the sea ice to record the ice drift. The observed data will be used to program the route of the autonomous underwater vehicle.

The newly developed devices complement the long-term measurements, which the Helmholtz-Manx Plank Joint Research Group for deep-sea technology and ecology have been performing for more than 15 years in the so-called AWI Hausgarten (which means house garden) between Spitsbergen and Greenland. Resources of the Helmholtz infrastructure measure FRAM (Frontiers in Arctic Marine Monitoring) have been used to improve and to expand the long-term studies at the AWI-Hausgarten

Before "Polarstern" sails into the Hausgarten, two Italian working groups are using the voyage to travel from Bremerhaven to the North for their research. South of Spitsbergen, the geodynamic and hydrographic conditions and the gas leaks at the bottom of the Kveithola Trench are the focus of the research program. Another focus is on the exploration of spatial and temporal changes in the deep ocean currents southwest of Spitsbergen. Both projects are being carried out in the frame of the EU Eurofleets programme.

RV Polarstern will leave Bremerhaven on Monday, the 13th June 2016 with the high-tide in the evening at 7 pm. A large part of the nearly 50 participants of the scientific expedition participants will be debarking on June 23 during a short stopover in Longyearbyen, Spitsbergen. Here the deep-sea researchers embark and work on board until their expedition ends on 16th July in the Norwegian Tromsø. Then "Polarstern" focusing on oceanography takes course towards Greenland, where the interactions between the ocean and a glacier at 79 degrees North are to be examined. The last Arctic expedition in 2016 takes place in the Central Arctic, before the research vessel is expected to return to its homeport of Bremerhaven at the end of October.

Notes for Editors:

Your contact person in the Dept. of Communications and Media Relations is Dr Folke Mehrtens, tel. +49 (0)471 4831-2007 (e-mail: Folke.Mehrtens(at)awi.de).

Printable images are available in the online version of this press release: http://www.awi.de/nc/en/about-us/service/press.html

The Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) conducts research in the Arctic, Antarctic and oceans of the high and mid-latitudes. It coordinates polar research in Germany and provides major infrastructure to the international scientific community, such as the research icebreaker Polarstern and stations in the Arctic and Antarctica. The Alfred Wegener Institute is one of the 18 research centres of the Helmholtz Association, the largest scientific organisation in Germany.

Ralf Röchert | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.awi.de

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

21.08.2017 | Health and Medicine

Scientists from the MSU studied new liquid-crystalline photochrom

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>