Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study Shows the Factors Influencing Which Conservation News Get Shared or Liked in Twitter and Facebook

04.03.2015

Public awareness is often a crucial first step towards policy change and resolution of conservation issues because societal values determine whether initiatives gain support. There is evidence that public engagement positively influences civic participation. Therefore, conservation science needs to engage the general public to ensure successful conservation interventions.

News coverage of conservation issues is an important pathway to transfer information to large audiences because it can translate academic research and policy for general audiences. A team of researchers led by the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore (NUS) Faculty of Science recently concluded a study to better understand the factors influencing the spread of conservation news in online media.

The research team, led by Ms Le Nghiem of the NUS Department of Biological Sciences and Dr Sarah Papworth, who was formerly with the Department and is now with the Royal Holloway University of London, discovered that news sites have the greatest impact on how popular an online article will be on Facebook and Twitter. They found that online news articles about climate change or charismatic mammals and those with illustrations were more likely to be shared or liked on Facebook and Twitter.

Their findings also revealed that five per cent of articles in conservation journals are reported in online news with the probability of reporting largely depending on the journal as opposed to the topic of the article. The results of their study were published in Conservation Biology in January 2015.

The team sampled research articles published from 2011 to 2013 in the eight journals with the highest impact factor in the biodiversity conservation category on Web of Science, as well as open-access journals that publish research on conservation and conservation articles in the highest impact multidisciplinary journals. They assessed differences in the frequency in which conservation research is featured in online news sites and the impact of online conservation news content and delivery on Facebook likes and shares and Twitter tweets.

Explaining the importance of understanding the spread of online news, Ms Le Nghiem, one of the lead authors, said, “To ensure successful conservation interventions, there is a need to engage the general public. Although online technologies such as Twitter and Facebook offer new opportunities to accelerate communication between conservation scientists and the online public, factors influencing the spread of conservation news in online media are not well understood. This study aims to fill this knowledge gap.”

“Conservation scientists could use these new findings to choose appropriate online media channels to communicate with the public and increase the awareness and effectiveness of their efforts,” added Assistant Professor David Bickford, one of the co-authors of the paper.

The researchers argue that in addition to scientists, policy makers and the public, news media should be considered a fourth sector in the conservation process — one that does not passively transmit information but whose actors have their own motivations. When these motivations align with those of conservation scientists, news media offers opportunities to rapidly disseminate academic research and policy to potentially large audiences.

The generation of online content is not, however, sufficient to engage the online public. Therefore, linking online news articles about research to online platforms such as Twitter and Facebook could encourage greater interaction.

Contact Information
Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
Phone: +65 6516 5399

Carolyn Fong | newswise
Further information:
http://www.nus.edu.sg

Further reports about: Facebook NUS Twitter Web of Science biodiversity conservation conservation

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht High Number of Science Enthusiasts in Switzerland
05.02.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality
06.12.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences

MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies

20.02.2018 | Medical Engineering

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>