Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Printed speakers make the photos sound

04.05.2015

The Institute for Print and Media Technology at TU Chemnitz provided a picture book with printed electronics at the World Press Photo competition and, thus, created for each winning photograph its own sound environment

At the annual meeting of the 58th World Press Photo competition 2015, the world`s best press photos were presented on April 25th in Amsterdam, which was also the premier for a sonorous innovation from Chemnitz.


Marlene Klüßendorf, a student at the Print and Media Technology at TU Chemnitz, checks the quality of the screen for printing the loudspeakers.

Photo: TU Chemnitz/Pressefoto Schmidt

Scientists from the Institute for Print and Media Technology at Technische Universität Chemnitz equipped a large format picture book that shows the winning photos in brilliant quality with printed electronics. If you open this T-book – where the “T“ stands for tone – and flip through the book, it begins to produce sound from the speakers located inside the book pages.

“The T-book is a milestone in the development of printed information“, says Prof. Dr. Arved C. Hübler. He feels certain that the T-book developed by his team at the Institute for Print and Media Technology opens the door to many other developments: ”The tablets of the future will be printed on paper, and the T-book gives the first view of what will be possible.“

A printed sensor determines which book page was opened by the reader and then the appropriate sound is audible. The sound is generated loud and clear directly from the paper. The creative agency Serviceplan in Munich has developed the book in cooperation with the researchers of TU Chemnitz and created for each winning photograph their own environment in order to expand the voices, sounds and music captured by the photographer`s mood.

“The technology behind the sound book is really amazing“, said Cosimo Möller, Executive Creative Director at the Serviceplan Campaign, who steered the project from the very beginning. “When someone opens the book with the best photos of the year suddenly a page starts to vibrate, produces sound and tells its own story to the viewer. The book describes the background of the images and awakens the authentic emotions with voices and sounds. The photographs come still to life for the viewer.“

The T-book is based on printed electronics, a technology trend in which the Institute for Print and Media Technology at TU Chemnitz acts as a global leader for 15 years. Thereby the electronic components are printed on paper with conventional printing methods. This enables a cost-effective mass production. Three years ago, the researchers were able to present the first printed speakers.

In this case a thin layer of piezoelectric polymer is printed, which starts to vibrate under tension resulted in emitted tones. In order to feed the electrical signals, printed electrically conductive layers are needed in addition.

Scientists from Chemnitz developed the technology further for the T-book. The loudspeaker is laminated in between two parts of the book page, so that the front and back can be covered with a high-quality color printing. The data for the book with a total of 100 illustrated pages for the World Press Photo competition are given by an SD card, which is embedded in the book cover.

Batteries and control electronics are also hosted in the book cover. The binding of the book has been realized by Cornelia Ahnert from atelierBUCH in Lichtenau near Chemnitz. Parts of the new technology have been developed under the Federal Cluster of Excellence "Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden" (cfaed) at TU Chemnitz.

The film about the T-Book, which was shown during the annual meeting of the 58th World Press Photo competition, can be found on the YouTube Channel of TU Chemnitz. The TV report of the SACHSEN FERNSEHEN can also be viewed on the YouTube Channel.

More information about T-book at: http://www.t-book.audio

Contact: Prof. Dr. Arved C. Hübler, Phone +49 371 531-23610, Email pmhuebler@mb.tu-chemnitz.de

Katharina Thehos | Technische Universität Chemnitz
Further information:
http://www.tu-chemnitz.de/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New Technologies for A/V Analysis and Search
13.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Greenland ice flow likely to speed up: New data assert glaciers move over sediment, which gets more slippery as it gets wetter

17.08.2017 | Earth Sciences

Mars 2020 mission to use smart methods to seek signs of past life

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>