Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Two international awards for Ewine van Dishoeck

22.06.2015

The World Cultural Council honours Ewine van Dishoeck, Professor for molecular Astrophysics at the Leiden University and External Scientific Member of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), with this year’s Albert Einstein World Award of Science.

This prize is awarded to scientists for their outstanding achievements, which bring scientific progress and benefit to mankind. Furthermore, the European Astronomical Society (EAS) elected Ewine van Dishoeck as the Lodewijk Woltjer Lecturer 2015.

In this capacity she will give a lecture at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) at the end of June. The EAS recognizes with the prize her outstanding career, especially her work in the field of star- and planet-formation.

In her career as an astrochemist Ewine van Dishoeck has focused on interstellar clouds for 25 years now. These clouds seem black and invisible to the naked eye, but are indeed filled with the molecular material, from which the next generation of stars and planets form.

In 1995, van Dishoeck was able to detect key molecules – water, carbon dioxide, methane, formic acid and others – with the ESA Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) which is not hampered by the disturbing interference of the Earth’s atmosphere. With the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope, ISO’s successor, she discovered more components of protoplanetary discs: large amounts of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and acetylene (C2H2) gases. Both are constituents of amino and nucleic acids, the most important building blocks of life.

Since 2007 van Dishoeck has been external scientific member of the MPE. With her research group at the institute, she analyses how interstellar clouds evolve to planetary disks at sub-millimetre and infrared wavelengths using the Herschel Space Observatory and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. Not only do these data provide an inventory of water and complex molecules in regions of star and planet formation but they also probe the physical processes involved.

Ewine van Dishoeck’s research made a substantial contribution to establishing the relatively young interdisciplinary field of astrochemistry. “When I studied chemistry in Leiden, I was fascinated by the first discoveries of molecules in interstellar space. Today it is amazing to see the rich variety of molecules and solid particles in this unique laboratory and realize that they are actually the tiny building blocks of new planets like Earth”, says the scientist.

This year, van Dishoeck receives two awards for her research: The European Astronomical Society (EAS) elected her as Lodewijk Woltjer Lecturer 2015. This prize recognises her outstanding career, especially her work in the field of star- and planet-formation. She will hold a lecture about her work at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) on Tenerife, Spain, at the end of June, and receive a medal and a certificate.

What’s more, the World Cultural Council (WCC) bestows the Albert Einstein World Award of Science upon van Dishoeck, which values her work in the field of interstellar water chemistry as well as her broad vision of astrochemistry – linking quantum chemical calculations, laboratory studies, and astronomical modelling and observations. The jury highlighted that her fundamental discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the universe at the atomic level.

The Award Ceremony for the Albert Einstein World Award of Science will be held on 19 November 2015 at the University of Dundee; Ewine van Dishoeck will give her prize lecture the day before. In addition to a certificate and a commemorative medal the scientist will receive 10.000US$ prize money. The World Cultural Council is an international organization, founded to establish relations with the scientific, cultural and social institutions worldwide and to promote science and art for the benefit and progress of humankind. In particular, the WCC has awarded scientists, educators and artists since 1984, who contributed positively to the cultural enrichment of mankind. Former laureates of the Albert Einstein World Award of Science in the field of Astrophysics are Martin Rees (2003) and Margaret Burbidge (1988).

Contact

Dr. Hannelore Hämmerle

MPE Pressesprecherin

Phone: +49 (0)89 30000 3980

Fax: +49 (0)89 30000 3569

Email: pr@mpe.mpg.de

Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Garching

Dr. Hannelore Hämmerle | Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Garching

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht BMBF funds translational project to improve radiotherapy
10.05.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Photography: An unusual and surprising picture of science
04.05.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>