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Lasagni awarded with Materials Science and Technology Prize 2017

09.10.2017

Prof. Andrés Lasagni from the Institute of Manufacturing Engineering at the “Technische Universität Dresden” and head of the “Center for Advanced Micro-Photonics (CAMP)” at the Fraunhofer IWS received the Materials Science and Technology Prize 2017. Every two years the Federation of European Materials Societies (FEMS) awards the prize to young European materials scientists whose research work contributes significantly to material science and materials engineering.

Lasagni has been doing research in the field of laser structuring at the Fraunhofer IWS Dresden since September 2008 and at the “Technische Universität Dresden” since summer 2012.


Awarded the Materials Science and Technology Prize 2017 by the Federation of European Materials Societies (FEMS): Prof. Andrés Lasagni

© Berthold Leibinger Stiftung

Since June 2014, Lasagni has been holding the Open Topic Tenure Track Professorship for laser-based methods for large-area surface structuring at the Institute of Manufacturing Technology.

He focusses his research on the fabrication of micro- and nanostructured surfaces with the aim of creating new functions.

Together with his team, he develops laser-based processes to fabricate these structures at high speed.

Attended by more than 2000 visitors the official award ceremony took place at the EUROMAT 2017 conference (September 17 – 22, 2017) in Thessaloniki.

Your contact for further information:

Manager Center for Advanced Micro-Photonics (CAMP)
Prof. Dr. Andrés Lasagni
Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS
Winterbergstraße 28 | 01277 Dresden | www.iws.fraunhofer.de
andres-fabian.lasagni@iws.fraunhofer.de
Phone +49 351 83391-3007

Public Relations
Dr. Ralf Jäckel
Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS
Winterbergstraße 28 | 01277 Dresden | www.iws.fraunhofer.de ralf.jaeckel@iws.fraunhofer.de
Phone +49 351 83391-3444

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.iws.fraunhofer.de

Dr. Ralf Jaeckel | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

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