Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

First German to be granted the ISMAR Prize since 1980

08.05.2015

Hans Wolfgang Spiess receives ISMAR Prize 2015

Professor Hans Wolfgang Spiess, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, has been awarded the Prize of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance (ISMAR). ISMAR is the only international scientific organization which covers the whole research field of magnetic resonance (MR), including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).


Prof. Spiess

MPI-P

These and other MR-methods are used as main research tools in a very wide range of disciplines including Physics, Chemistry, Life Sciences, Materials Research and Medicine. In the course of his career, Spiess has made major inventions in all these diverse fields, now honored by this prestigious award. The prize, jointly conferred to him and a colleague from the Weizmann Institute, Israel, will be handed during the opening session of the upcoming international ISMAR 2015 Conference in August in Shanghai.

Spiess is the first German recipient of the Prize ever since it was given to the German American Hans Dehmelt (Nobel Prize in Physics 1989) and Günther Laukien (founder of BRUKER, market leader in magnetic resonance) in 1980.

World-class research

Hans Wolfgang Spiess, born in 1942, was appointed director at the newly founded Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in 1984. The research group which he directed until his retirement in November 2012 was standing out as a worldwide leader in the field of magnetic resonance. As such it was a coveted cooperation partner for many colleagues, in Germany and abroad.

His research on polymer and supramolecular systems is considered as fundamental, yet application-oriented and interdisciplinary. Such organic materials find widespread applications as high-performance polymers in technology and medicine. To develop and understand these systems, their structure and internal dynamics have to be known precisely: this is why NMR plays such an important role.

The technique is similar to MRI used in medicine and well-known to the general public. This method not only provides unique insights into the human body but also allows us to understand the relation between the molecular structure and function of materials.

Spiess’ achievements have been acknowledged by numerous national and international prizes and awards, including the Leibniz Prize, the Ampere Prize, the Liebig- and Walther Nernst Medals, the Paul J. Flory Research Prize, the Zavoisky Award, and the medal of honor of the State Rhineland-Palatinate, as well as several honorary doctorates conferred by foreign universities.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.mpip-mainz.mpg.de/ISMAR_Prize_2015_Spiess - Press release
http://www.mpip-mainz.mpg.de/polymer_spectroscopy - Information about Prof. Spiess and his research
http://www.mpip-mainz.mpg.de/home/en - Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research

Natacha Bouvier | Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Yuan Chang and Patrick Moore win prize for the discovery of two cancer viruses
14.03.2017 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht BMBF funding for diabetes research on pancreas chip
08.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>