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Eduard Arzt receives highest award from German Materials Society

21.09.2017

Eduard Arzt, scientific director of the INM, has been awarded the highest accolade by the German Society for Materials Science (DGM): The Heyn Commemorative Medal honors Eduard Arzt’s accomplishments in the fields of powder metallurgy, high-temperature alloys, nanostructures and adhesion of bio-inspired functional surfaces and their industrial applications. DGM acknowledges the creativity, depth and broad range of his research as well as his commitment to the next generation of materials scientists.

The native Austrian has won international recognition through over 400 publications, numerous patents and awards, such as the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize and the Stifterverband Science Award. For the research project “Engineering of biomimetic surfaces”, Eduard Arzt received an ERC Advanced Grant from the European Research Council with a value of € 2.5 million.


Eduard Arzt, scientific director and chairman of INM

Source: Bellhäuser, only free within this context

He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Austrian Academy of Sciences and many scientific advisory boards. Eduard Arzt is editor-in-chief of the leading materials review journal “Progress in Materials Science” and belongs to the selected group of ISI Highly Cited Researchers. More than 20 of his former collaborators hold professorships in materials science all over the world.

Short CV

Eduard Arzt studied physics and mathematics in Vienna, where he obtained his doctorate in 1980. After working at Cambridge University as a postdoc for a few years, he was a group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research in Stuttgart and visiting professor at Stanford University (USA). From 1990 to 2007, Eduard Arzt was director at the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Stuttgart, where he also held a professorship for Metals Physics. Since 2007, he has been scientific director and chair of the management board at the INM and professor for new materials at Saarland University.

Background

The DGM awards the Heyn Commemorative Medal for exceptional accomplishments in the field of materials science and engineering, through which considerable progress in a scientific, practical or economic aspect was achieved. According to the proposal of the Award Committee and the decision made by the Executive Board, the medal is awarded during DGM –Day, once a year. Please find further information here: https://www.dgm.de/en/about-dgm/honours/heyn-commemorative-medal/

INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbrücken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces. INM is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 240 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.leibniz-inm.de/en

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

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