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Applications open for EGU 2016 Science Journalism Fellowships (up to €5k)

05.01.2016

The second call for applications to the 2016 European Geosciences Union (EGU) Science Journalism Fellowship competition is now open. The fellowships enable journalists to follow scientists on location to report on ongoing research in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. Successful applicants receive up to €5000 to cover expenses related to their projects. The deadline for applications is 31 January.

Rather than awarding a published piece of science reporting, EGU Science Journalism Fellowships distinguish themselves from other science journalism prizes by awarding innovative proposals to report on geoscientific research not yet in the public sphere. The award offers journalists the opportunity to follow geoscientists on location and to develop an in-depth understanding of their research questions, approaches, findings and motivation. The aim of the fellowship is to promote excellence in geoscience reporting.

We invite proposals from professional, active journalists to report on ongoing research within the Earth, planetary and space sciences. Competitive proposals will (1) focus on a topic in the geosciences (including planetary and space sciences) with potential broad public appeal, (2) preferably feature leading Europe-based researchers, and (3) outline an original, well-informed approach to the subject.

The EGU may award a single or multiple fellowships, with a total of up to €5000 allocated between the selected candidates to cover expenses related to their proposals. Winner(s) will receive part of the award in advance and part upon successful completion of their project(s). If required, they will also receive assistance in liaising with scientists.

We strongly encourage applicants to submit proposals to report on new and exciting research areas that the wider public may be less familiar with. In addition, the judges may favour applications with smaller budgets, which allow more than one proposal to be awarded. Information about last year’s winning proposals is available online at http://www.egu.eu/news/137/mason-inman-and-karl-urban-awarded-egu-science-journa....

The winning journalist(s) should publish at least one substantial item reporting on their project(s). Products could include text (such as a feature article in print or electronic media, or a book), multimedia or photo features, and may be published in any European language. The winning project(s) should be completed within 12 months of the date of the award. This deadline can be extended in cases beyond the control of the fellow, such as when a scientific field trip is postponed.

Applications must be written in English and include:
(a) A proposal (2 pages): a working title, motivation, outline of approach, provisional plan of work, suggested publication outlets and an analysis of feasibility (including budget);
(b) A summary of experience (1 page): an account of professional affiliations, previous experience, expertise and acclaim.

Documents in file (a) should not include the applicant’s name, gender, contact details, or any other information that identifies the candidate, as this part of the application will be judged anonymously.

Applications must be submitted by e-mail in two PDF files [(a) and (b) above] to the EGU Media and Communications Manager, Bárbara Ferreira (media@egu.eu), by 31 January 2016. Submissions by this deadline will be evaluated by a committee comprised of practicing geoscientists and science communicators. The EGU will inform applicants of the competition outcome in February.

The EGU will not claim revenues from products resulting from the project, but should be given full access to these products for further dissemination via its online channels. Further, the winners should make clear in their final products that they were supported through a Science Journalism Fellowship from the European Geosciences Union. The winner(s) are encouraged to attend the EGU General Assembly to discuss their projects and experience following scientists on location.


MORE INFORMATION
The European Geosciences Union (EGU) is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. It is a non-profit interdisciplinary learned association of scientists founded in 2002. The EGU has a current portfolio of 17 diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open access format, and organises a number of topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. Its annual General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 11,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting’s sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth’s internal structure and atmosphere, climate, energy, and resources. The EGU 2016 General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria, from 17 to 22 April 2016. For information about meeting and press registration, please check http://media.egu.eu, or follow the EGU on Twitter (@EuroGeosciences) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/EuropeanGeosciencesUnion).

If you wish to receive our press releases via email, please use the Press Release Subscription Form at http://www.egu.eu/news/subscribe/. Subscribed journalists and other members of the media receive EGU press releases under embargo (if applicable) 24 hours in advance of public dissemination.

CONTACT
Bárbara Ferreira
EGU Media and Communications Manager
Munich, Germany
Tel: +49-89-2180-6703
Email: media@egu.eu

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.egu.eu/news/fellowship/ - EGU Science Journalism Fellowship (including past awardees)
http://www.egu.eu/news/137/mason-inman-and-karl-urban-awarded-egu-science-journa... - Last year’s winning proposals

Dr. Bárbara Ferreira | European Geosciences Union

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