Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World’s Highest Magnetic Field* (1,020MHz) NMR developed

03.07.2015

Application of High-Temperature Superconductor Was the Key. A Big Step Forward in Accelerating the Development of New Drugs and Materials

The research team of Japan's National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), RIKEN, Kobe Steel and JEOL RESONANCE successfully developed the NMR system equipped with world’s highest magnetic field, 1,020 MHz, supported by the JST-SENTAN program “Development of Systems and Technology for Advanced Measurement and Analysis”.


Photo: A part of the recently developed 1,020 MHz-NMR system equipped with superconducting magnets (about 5 m high and weighing about 15 tons). This part contains coils made of a high-temperature superconductor. Liquid helium is used for cooling.

Copyright : NIMS

This research result was published in Journal of Magnetic Resonance on 15 May 2015 (Kenjiro Hashi, Shinobu Ohki, Shinji Matsumoto, Gen Nishijima, Atsushi Goto, Kenzo Deguchi, Kazuhiko Yamada, Takashi Noguchi, Shuji Sakai, Masato Takahashi, Yoshinori Yanagisawa, Seiya Iguchi, Toshio Yamazaki, Hideaki Maeda, Ryoji Tanaka, Takahiro Nemoto, Hiroto Suematsu, Takashi Miki, Kazuyoshi Saito and Tadashi Shimizu, Title:”Achievement of 1,020 MHz NMR”, DOI:10.1016/j.jmr.2015.04.009).

The research team consisting of researchers at NIMS, RIKEN, Kobe Steel and JEOL RESONANCE (a consolidated subsidiary company of JEOL) successfully developed the NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) system equipped with world’s highest magnetic field, 1,020 MHz, during engagement in the JST-SENTAN program “Development of Systems and Technology for Advanced Measurement and Analysis”. In addition, taking actual measurements with this new system, the team confirmed its considerably enhanced performance compared to conventional NMR systems in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

NMR systems have been used for various purposes including 3D conformational analysis of biopolymers such as proteins, organic chemistry and materials research. In particular, it is one of the indispensable tools for the development of new drugs. In the development of a new drug, it is vital to understand protein structures in a quick and accurate manner.

In this view, improving the performance of NMR systems is of great importance. Magnetic field strength is a key indicator of the performance of NMR systems, and thus there had been fierce competition to develop NMR systems with magnetic fields greater than 1,000 MHz. For a long time, it was broadly expected that the use of high-temperature superconducting technology would enable producing magnetic fields above 1,000 MHz. However, because high-temperature superconductors had problems such as being fragile and difficult to process, no party had achieved their practical use for a long run.

Through developing several new technologies including the conversion of the high-temperature superconductor developed by NIMS in 1988 into the form of wire material, the research team recently created the NMR system equipped with world’s highest magnetic field at 1,020 MHz.

Before making this accomplishment, the team spent 20 years of planning, designing and construction, as well as overcoming many hardships such as suspension of the project due to the damage to the nearly completed system caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake, encountering a serious worldwide shortage of helium supply, and the sudden passing of the team leader.

It is expected that the super-high magnetic field NMR will greatly contribute to various fields such as structural biology, analytical chemistry and materials engineering. Furthermore, considering that NMR requires a magnetic field with extraordinary precision, the high-temperature superconducting technology that was cultivated during the development of NMR is applicable to various high-tech systems such as MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), nuclear fusion, linear motor trains and superconducting power cables.

A part of this study was published in the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on May 15, 2015, and was presented at the Experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Conference, the largest international conference on NMR, held from April 19 to 24 in the United States, and at the 57th Solid-State NMR and Materials Forum held on May 21, 2015 in Japan.

*World’s Highest Magnetic Field: 1020MHz (24.0T) As of Apr 17, 2015


Associated links
NIMS article

Mikiko Tanifuji | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New design improves performance of flexible wearable electronics
23.06.2017 | North Carolina State University

nachricht Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics
22.06.2017 | American Chemical Society

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>