Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Stronger turbine blades with molybdenum silicides

26.09.2016

Researchers at Kyoto University have found that molybdenum silicides can improve the efficiency of turbine blades in ultrahigh-temperature combustion systems.

Gas turbines are the engines that generate electricity in power plants. The operating temperatures of their combustion systems can exceed 1600 °C. The nickel-based turbine blades used in these systems melt at temperatures 200 °C lower and thus require air-cooling to function. Turbine blades made out of materials with higher melting temperatures would require less fuel consumption and lead to lower CO2 emissions.


Figure (left): Electron micrographs of directionally solidified (DS) ingots of binary composites. (right): Temperature dependence of yield stress of DS MoSi2/Mo5Si3 eutectic composites and some high-temperature materials. ©2016 Hirotaka Matsunoshita, Yuta Sasai, Kosuke Fujiwara, Kyosuke Kishida and Haruyuki Inui.

Materials scientists at Japan’s Kyoto University investigated the properties of various compositions of molybdenum silicides, with and without additional ternary elements.

Previous research showed that fabricating molybdenum silicide-based composites by pressing and heating their powders – known as powder metallurgy – improved their resistance to fracturing at ambient temperatures but lowered their high-temperature strength, due to the development of silicon dioxide layers within the material.

The Kyoto University team fabricated their molybdenum silicide-based materials using a method known as “directional solidification,” in which molten metal progressively solidifies in a certain direction.

The team found that a homogeneous material could be formed by controlling the solidification rate of the molybdenum silicide-based composite during fabrication and by adjusting the amount of the ternary element added to the composite.

The resulting material starts deforming plastically under uniaxial compression above 1000 °C. Also, the material’s high-temperature strength increases through microstructure refinement. Adding tantalum to the composite is more effective than adding vanadium, niobium or tungsten for improving the strength of the material at temperatures around 1400 °C. The alloys fabricated by the Kyoto University team are much stronger at high temperatures than modern nickel-based superalloys as well as recently developed ultrahigh-temperature structural materials, the researchers report in their study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.


For further information please contact:

Hirotaka Matsunoshita, Yuta Sasai, Kosuke Fujiwara, Kyosuke Kishida and Haruyuki Inui*:
(Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan, Hirotaka Matsunoshita, Kyosuke Kishida and Haruyuki Inui are also at the Center for Elements Strategy Initiative for Structural Materials (ESISM), Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
*E-mail: inui.haruyuki.3z@kyoto-u.ac.jp)


Article information
“Plastic deformation of directionally-solidified ingots of binary and some ternary MoSi2/Mo5Si3 eutectic composites”,
Hirotaka Matsunoshita, Yuta Sasai, Kosuke Fujiwara, Kyosuke Kishida and Haruyuki Inui:
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials Vol. 17 (2016) p. 1218248

Accepted author version posted online: 28 Jul 2016,
http://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14686996.2016.1218248
Published online: 08 Sep 2016
http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14686996.2016.1218248

Journal Information
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM) is the leading open access, international journal for outstanding research articles across all aspects of materials science. Our audience is the international materials community across the disciplines of materials science, physics, chemistry, biology as well as engineering.

The journal covers a broad spectrum of materials science research including functional materials, synthesis and processing, theoretical analyses, characterization and properties of materials. Emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature of materials science and issues at the forefront of the field, such as energy and environmental issues, as well as medical and bioengineering applications


http://tandfonline.com/loi/tsta20#.VrgX82fotYU

For more information about the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, contact

Mikiko Tanifuji
Publishing Director
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials
Email: TANIFUJI.Mikiko@nims.go.jp

Associated links

Mikiko Tanifuji | Research SEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com

Further reports about: Materials Science blades materials molybdenum turbine blades

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen
24.03.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

nachricht Researchers make flexible glass for tiny medical devices
24.03.2017 | Brigham Young University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>