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SCHOTT products provide preventive protection for museums and art exhibitions

05.10.2015

Protective glass against many dangers: fire, ballistic and manual attack as well as UV rays

Mainz & Jena (Germany), October 1, 2015 - The product portfolio of the international technology group SCHOTT includes various safety glasses for comprehensive protection of museums, exhibition halls and all types of art work. The company has played a pioneering role in the development of glass laminates that withstand burglary attempts and shelling, yet offer fire resistance for higher building safety.


MIROGARD® Protect Ultra and conventional image glazing by comparison.

Picture: Klimt, Gustav, 1862-1918.

“The Kiss” (1907/08)

Location: Vienna, gallery in Austria

©ARTOTHEK


Dürer’s “Triumphal Arch of Emperor Maximilian I” presented itself to the visitors of the exhibition “Dürer. Kunst - Künstler – Kontext” at Städel Museum (2013) behind glazing that consisted of double-sided anti-reflective AMIRAN® glass from SCHOTT in a total size of approximately 3.1 m x 3.75 m. Photo: SCHOTT

Furthermore, SCHOTT offers picture framing and safety glazing that not only protect works of art and paintings from vandalism. Representatives of SCHOTT will give presentations on “Transparent Security” at this year’s event series “Das grüne Museum” (The Green Museum) in Frankfurt/Main on October 8, in Berlin on October 14 and in Vienna on October 28.

Preventive conservation of art works already begins with optimal protection of the building in which they are displayed. Here, SCHOTT has developed highly efficient, yet compact glass laminates that withstand burglary attempts and ballistic attacks, while simultaneously offering protection and security in the event of a fire.

PYRANOVA® secure glazing can fend off multiple attacks at the same time. In addition, it is thin and thus saves weight. NOVOLAY® secure types of glass exhibit low specific density and unmatched transparency thanks to their special glass composition.

SCHOTT’s special glasses MIROGARD® Protect Ultra and AMIRAN® provide direct protection for works of art. The new picture glazing glass MIROGARD® Protect Ultra offers extremely high UV protection of 99.9 percent and very good splinter protection. Another big advantage is that it has a light weight of 6.5 kilograms per square meter, and thus can be installed very quickly and easily. Due to its minimal thickness of 2.95 mm, the new laminated glass fits into any standard frame solution.

SCHOTT also offers a reliable glazing solution for art that cannot be framed. AMIRAN® safety glazing reliably protects precious art against vandalism and eliminates virtually all distracting reflections. Due to its anti-reflective coating, the glass offers excellent transmittance: it allows up to 98 percent of the light to pass through unhindered without causing any reflections. This is particularly important for showcases because light differs considerably in front of and behind the glass.

Preventive conservation is the focus of this year’s event series “Das grüne Museum” in Frankfurt/Main, Berlin and Vienna. The SCHOTT representatives Ulrich Huber, Sales Manager for Architectural Glass, Claus-Peter Jacobi and Frank Thomas, both Sales Managers for Fire-Resistant and Safety Glass, as well as Oliver Kienast, Sales Manager for Fire-Resistant and Safety Glass in Austria, will speak on the topic of “Transparent Security.”

For more information, please visit: http://www.schott.com/architecture/english/index.html

AMIRAN®, MIROGARD®,NOVOLAY® and PYRANOVA® are registered trademarks of SCHOTT AG.

Media contact
SCHOTT AG
Dr. Haike Frank
Public Relations Manager
Phone: +49 (0)6131 - 66 4088
haike.frank@schott.com
www.schott.com

ABOUT SCHOTT

SCHOTT is a leading international technology group in the areas of specialty glass and glass-ceramics. The company has more than 130 years of outstanding development, materials and technology expertise and offers a broad portfolio of high-quality products and intelligent solutions. SCHOTT is an innovative enabler for many industries, including the home appliance, pharmaceutical, electronics, optics, automotive and aviation industries. SCHOTT strives to play an important part of everyone’s life and is committed to innovation and sustainable success. The group maintains a global presence with production sites and sales offices in 35 countries. With its workforce of approximately 15,400 employees, sales of 1.87 billion euros were generated in fiscal year 2013/2014. The parent company, SCHOTT AG, has its headquarters in Mainz (Germany) and is solely owned by the Carl Zeiss Foundation. As a foundation company, SCHOTT assumes special responsibility for its employees, society and the environment.

Media contact
SCHOTT AG - Hattenbergstrasse 10 - 55122 Mainz - Germany
Phone: +49 (0)6131/66-2411 - www.schott.com

Dr. Haike Frank | SCHOTT AG

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