Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Optimized analytics reduce “false negatives” in the detection of nanoparticles

23.03.2016

The INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials has joined forces with a manufacturer of analytical equipment to reduce particles losses and avoid false negatives. They developed reference nanoparticles and used them to investigate how the analysis can be improved.

Many everyday products and our environment contain nanoparticles, and there is increasing interest in finding them. The particles and their sizes are commonly detected using specialized analytical techniques.

If nanoparticles are lost in the analytical apparatus, they are not detected, and a “false negative” result occurs. The INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials has joined forces with a manufacturer of analytical equipment to reduce particles losses and avoid false negatives. They developed reference nanoparticles and used them to investigate how the analysis can be improved.

In project DINAFF, researchers at INM and Superon GmbH managed to reduce the loss of nanoparticles during analysis and, therefore, to improve the limit of detection. The researchers modified the inner surface of the analytical apparatus, optimized measurement parameters such as flow speed, and tuned the surface properties of the target nanoparticles.

“We worked with so-called tracer particles for our analyses,” Tobias Kraus from INM explained. “These are nanoparticles that we deliberately add to each sample. We therefore know that we should be able to find these particles in the sample. If we do not find them, something during the analysis impedes detection and causes a false negative.”

Parameters of the analytical method then have to be adjusted so that the tracer particles become detectable. The head of the Structure Formation group continued: “The more similar our tracer particles are to the real nanoparticles, the more reliably the real nanoparticles can be detected later.”

The researchers applied the so-called AF4 Method to detect nanoparticles. In this method, nanoparticles are lost when they adhere to tubing or other internal surfaces of the apparatus and no longer arrive at the detector.

Nanoparticles may also form clumps that are so large that the detector no longer responds to them. “Preventing these two main causes of false negatives requires a combination of suitable tracer particles, the right analytical method, and optimized parameters,” Kraus says.

In the future, the researchers will offer their expertise in all three areas to interested parties from industry. They will provide the synthesis of tracer particles, consultation regarding analysis of the industrial partners, and particle analysis as a service at INM.

Background:
“DINAFF – Detection and Identification of Nanoparticles” is a project funded by the central innovation program for SMEs (“ZIM”). The project is coordinated by AiF Projekt GmbH, Berlin. DINAFF received subsidies of 175,000 euro from the German Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Industry. The project ended in December 2015. Partners in the cooperation were the INM – Leibniz-Institute for New Materials, Saarbrücken and Superon GmbH, Dernbach.

AF4 stands for “asymmetrical-flow-field-flow fractionation”. In this method, the liquid test sample is separated over a semi-permeable membrane: Nanoparticles are separated according to size by various flow currents and directions and are detected in different detectors.

Your expert:
Dr. Tobias Kraus
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Structure Formation
Deputy Head, InnovationCenter INM
Phone: +49681-9300-389
tobias.kraus@leibniz-inm.de

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological systems and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbrücken, is an internationally leading center for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 220 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.leibniz-inm.de/en
http://www.leibniz-inm.de/en/interface-materials/structure-formation/
http://www.leibniz-gemeinschaft.de/en

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: INM Leibniz-Institut Nanoparticles Neue Materialien

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer
20.10.2017 | Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

nachricht Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds
20.10.2017 | Lomonosov Moscow State University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>