Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fraunhofer IST sells its first pilot-scale unit for patterned plasma treatment of polymer films

19.01.2015

Many years went into development, then came six months with the screwdriver, of tweaking and testing, and now they are finally there: the scientists of the Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films in Braunschweig together with their partners GRT GmbH & Co. KG, Systec System- und Anlagentechnik GmbH & Co. KG, WLW Wagner Leisner Wolter GmbH and Schuler Konstruktionen GmbH & Co. KG have built their first reel-to-reel plasma printing system and delivered it to a Japanese company in the Osaka area.

The manufacturer of functional polymer films and sheets uses the system for research and development purposes.


Reel-to-rell plasma treatment of polymer films.

© Fraunhofer IST

"With this system, films measuring up to 450 mm in width can be continuously treated with plasma, and very specifically only at the desired locations", says Dr. Michael Thomas, the project leader and head of department at the Fraunhofer IST. A further scaling-up is in the planning stage.

‘Plasma printing’ exploits the nature of the fourth state of matter – plasma - with its chemically reactive components as a tool to produce micropatterned surfaces.

For instance, the wettability of polymer surfaces can be area-selectively adjusted to create hydrophilic or hydrophobic areas, that is, water-loving or water-repellent areas. Water-loving areas were produced with surface energies up to 72 mN/m.

With the plasma, furthermore, plastics can be activated without elaborate chemical etching processes in an environmentally friendly manner such that structured, well-adherent metallization is possible in a subsequent step.

'Plasma printing' is also particularly suitable for the selective functionalization of surfaces with reactive groups which permit a subsequent chemical coupling reaction. There is a need for such functionalizations in, among other fields, the life sciences, for example, in the development of biochips and biosensors.

This technology has a great potential for development, as our Japanese collaboration partners also recognize. Hardly had he set foot back in Germany, when Dr. Thomas received the news that there was great interest in further cooperation after the evaluation phase.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ist.fraunhofer.de

Dr. Simone Kondruweit | Fraunhofer-Institut für Schicht- und Oberflächentechnik IST

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>