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Flat gallium joins roster of new 2-D materials

12.03.2018

Rice University, Indian Institute of Science introduce gallenene

Scientists at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have discovered a method to make atomically flat gallium that shows promise for nanoscale electronics.


Models of the top and side structures of two forms of gallenene are shown after exfoliation from different sides of bulk gallium. Scientists at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, discovered a method to make atomically flat gallium that shows promise for nanoscale electronics.

Credit: Ajayan Research Group/Rice University

The Rice lab of materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan and colleagues in India created two-dimensional gallenene, a thin film of conductive material that is to gallium what graphene is to carbon.

Extracted into a two-dimensional form, the novel material appears to have an affinity for binding with semiconductors like silicon and could make an efficient metal contact in two-dimensional electronic devices, the researchers said.

The new material was introduced in Science Advances.

Gallium is a metal with a low melting point; unlike graphene and many other 2-D structures, it cannot yet be grown with vapor phase deposition methods. Moreover, gallium also has a tendency to oxidize quickly. And while early samples of graphene were removed from graphite with adhesive tape, the bonds between gallium layers are too strong for such a simple approach.

So the Rice team led by co-authors Vidya Kochat, a former postdoctoral researcher at Rice, and Atanu Samanta, a student at the Indian Institute of Science, used heat instead of force.

Rather than a bottom-up approach, the researchers worked their way down from bulk gallium by heating it to 29.7 degrees Celsius (about 85 degrees Fahrenheit), just below the element's melting point. That was enough to drip gallium onto a glass slide. As a drop cooled just a bit, the researchers pressed a flat piece of silicon dioxide on top to lift just a few flat layers of gallenene.

They successfully exfoliated gallenene onto other substrates, including gallium nitride, gallium arsenide, silicone and nickel. That allowed them to confirm that particular gallenene-substrate combinations have different electronic properties and to suggest that these properties can be tuned for applications.

"The current work utilizes the weak interfaces of solids and liquids to separate thin 2-D sheets of gallium," said Chandra Sekhar Tiwary, principal investigator on the project he completed at Rice before becoming an assistant professor at the Indian Institute of Technology in Gandhinagar, India. "The same method can be explored for other metals and compounds with low melting points."

Gallenene's plasmonic and other properties are being investigated, according to Ajayan. "Near 2-D metals are difficult to extract, since these are mostly high-strength, nonlayered structures, so gallenene is an exception that could bridge the need for metals in the 2-D world," he said.

###

Co-authors of the paper are graduate student Yuan Zhang and Associate Research Professor Robert Vajtai of Rice; Anthony Stender, a former Rice postdoctoral researcher and now an assistant professor at Ohio University; Sanjit Bhowmick, Praveena Manimunda and Syed Asif of Bruker Nano Surfaces, Minneapolis; and Rice alumnus Abhishek Singh of the Indian Institute of Science. Ajayan is chair of Rice's Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, the Benjamin M. and Mary Greenwood Anderson Professor in Engineering and a professor of chemistry.

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research sponsored the research, with additional support from the Indo-US Science and Technology Forum, the government of India and a Rice Center for Quantum Materials/Smalley-Curl Postdoctoral Fellowship in Quantum Materials.

David Ruth
713-348-6327
david@rice.edu

Mike Williams
713-348-6728
mikewilliams@rice.edu

Read the abstract at href="http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/3/e1701373">http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/3/e1701373

This news release can be found online at http://news.rice.edu/2018/03/09/flat-gallium-joins-roster-of-new-2-d-materials/

Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews

Related materials:

Ajayan Research Group: http://ajayan.rice.edu

Rice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering: https://msne.rice.edu

Images for download:

http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0312_GALLIUM-1-WEB-2gsenm5.jpg

http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0312_GALLIUM-2-WEB-2eg0e6s.jpg

Models of the top and side structures of two forms of gallenene are shown after exfoliation from different sides of bulk gallium. Scientists at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, discovered a method to make atomically flat gallium that shows promise for nanoscale electronics. (Credit: Ajayan Research Group/Rice University)

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview.

David Ruth | EurekAlert!

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