Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Dynamic DNA polymers can be reversed using biocompatible techniques

18.05.2016

DNA-based straight and branched polymers or nanomaterials that can be created and dissolved using biocompatible methods are now possible thanks to the work of Penn State biomedical engineers.


A nanotree made of DNA can be reversed under standard physiological conditions without burning or other harsh interventions, according to a new study led by Yong Wang, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Penn State.

Credit: Penn State

Synthetic polymers may lead to advances in a broad range of biological and biomedical applications such as drug delivery, molecular detection and bioimaging.

"Achieving reversibility of synthetic polymers and nanomaterials has been a long-standing dream for many biomedical engineers," said Yong Wang, associate professor of biomedical engineering. "Scientists want to see these polymers reverse or disappear when we are finished with them, but that often involves the use of high temperatures and chemical solvents. With that idea in mind, the aim of our study was to create synthetic polymers that would decompose without the use of harsh elements or increased stress. In principle, the polymers could be further tuned to synthesize a diverse array of nanomaterials or bulk materials."

To assemble the dynamic polymers, researchers linked DNA initiators -- straight DNA strands with a single binding domain -- to two DNA monomers with multiple domains. The bonded molecules formed a linear double-stranded DNA structure with a separate and functional side group. The researchers then created a trigger molecule that attached to the side group and initiated a "reverse without the involvement of any non-physiological factors," according to a recent article in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

The researchers also showed that branched polymers responded to the same technique.

Branched polymers synthesized with a straight polymer and two DNA monomers yielded two functional side groups with the ability to reverse when induced by two molecular triggers.

The researchers performed preliminary testing of the model in water, with subsequent testing conducted on synthetic antibodies. Antibody trials proved that growth and depolymerization of straight and branched polymers were also possible on the microparticle surface and in the extracellular matrix.

Wang and his team are hopeful that by uniting the polymers with various molecules and materials, their findings will hold value for a number of wide-ranging applications.

###

Collaborating with Wang on the project were Niancao Chen, research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and recent Penn State Ph.D and Xuechen Shi, Penn State graduate student in bioengineering.

Integrated National Science Foundation Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education and the National Institutes of Health Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute supported this work.

Media Contact

A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481

 @penn_state

http://live.psu.edu 

A'ndrea Elyse Messer | EurekAlert!

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht A new tool for discovering nanoporous materials
23.05.2017 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

nachricht Did you know that packaging is becoming intelligent through flash systems?
23.05.2017 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>