Tmem16f-deficient mice – A model for studying osteoporosis

During vertebrate skeletal development, osteoblasts produce a mineralized bone matrix by deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the extracellular matrix. Anoctamin6/Tmem16F (Ano6) belongs to a conserved family of transmembrane proteins. The gene Ano6 encodes a Ca-activated chloride channel. In addition, Ano6 has been linked to phosphatidylserine (PS) scrambling in the plasma membrane. During skeletogenesis, Ano6 mRNA is expressed in differentiating and mature osteoblasts.
Tmem16f-deficient mice were generated by complete gene deletion.

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