marine food

Potentially toxic plankton algae may play a crucial role in the future Arctic

Plankton algae that supplement photosynthesis by eating other algae and bacteria may play a crucial role in the future Arctic. As the sea ice shrinks in the Arctic, the plankton…

Shrinking snowcaps fuel harmful algal blooms in Arabian sea

A uniquely resilient organism all but unheard of in the Arabian Sea 20 years ago has been proliferating and spreading at an alarming pace, forming thick,…

Study looks to iron from microbes for climate help

Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could “fertilize” microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new…

When the sea blossoms

If the sea turns red or green, phytoplankton is at work – countless microscopic algae, which use sunlight to generate energy and cause coloration.

Diatom ooze sediments are a large marine mercury sink

Atmospheric derived mercury is transformed in the ocean to toxic methylmercury, which is enriched in fish. Large marine predators such as tuna are strongly…

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

The most catastrophic mass extinction on Earth took place about 252 million years ago – at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geological periods. Up…

Increased carbon dioxide enhances plankton growth, opposite of what was expected

Coccolithophores–tiny calcifying plants that are part of the foundation of the marine food web–have been increasing in relative abundance in the North…

Revealing the ocean's hidden fertilizer

An essential nutrient for every living organism–humans require approximately 700 milligrams per day–we're rarely concerned about consuming enough because it…

Gulf of Mexico marine food web changes over the decades

Scientists in the Gulf of Mexico now have a better understanding of how naturally-occurring climate cycles–as well as human activities–can trigger widespread…

Seahorse heads have a 'no wake zone' that's made for catching prey

“A seahorse is one the slowest swimming fish that we know of, but it's able to capture prey that swim at incredible speeds for their size,” said Brad Gemmell,…

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