Global Collaborative Efforts Help Delineate Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Causes, Characteristics and Trends in China

The first study, appearing in the December 2012 print issue of PLOS ONE, investigated the causes, characteristics and trends of pediatric TBIs in China and found that falls, struck by/against objects and traffic collisions were the top external causes of TBI.

The study also found that approximately six percent of all TBIs among children under two years of age were caused by suspected child abuse. This is the first study to highlight the important role of suspected child abuse in causing TBIs among infants in China and has led to the second study appearing in the November 2012 issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, which examined abuse-related TBIs among children in China.

These two publications are not only the first steps in understanding the causes of traumatic brain injury among children in China but a way to highlight the success of global collaborations in injury research.

Since its inception in 2004, the International Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy has established several international collaborations, including the one with Wuhan Children’s Hospital, and has worked to decrease the burden of injury morbidity and mortality worldwide. “The successful collaboration with Wuhan Children’s Hospital is a testament to their leaders’ dedication and commitment to promoting academic excellence and innovation in clinical care,” said Huiyun Xiang, MD, MPH, PhD and Director for International Programs at the Center for Injury Research and Policy.
“Globalization brings many challenges, as well as great opportunities, and we are excited about our collaboration with Wuhan Children’s Hospital,” said Dr. Xiang, also an Associate Professor of the Division of Epidemiology at The Ohio State University College of Public Health.

“In the past five years, a total of seven physicians from Wuhan Children’s Hospital received clinical training at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. These physicians have become a driving force for innovative care and academic excellence at Wuhan Children’s Hospital,” said Jianbo Shao, MD, Vice-President for Research and Training at Wuhan Children’s Hospital. “We cherish the relationship with Nationwide Children’s Hospital and look forward to more collaboration in scientific research and clinical training between the two organizations.”

The studies are both available online. “Characteristics and Trends of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries Treated at a Large Pediatric Medical Center in China 2002-2011” is available on the PLOS ONE website by visiting at http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0051634. “Characteristics and Trends of Hospitalized Pediatric Abuse Head Trauma in Wuhan, China: 2002-2011”is available through the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health’s website at http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/9/11/4187.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital works globally to reduce injury-related pediatric death and disabilities. With innovative research as its core, CIRP works to continually improve the scientific understanding of the epidemiology, biomechanics, prevention, acute treatment and rehabilitation of injuries. CIRP serves as a pioneer by translating cutting edge injury research into education, policy and advances in clinical care. For related injury prevention materials or to learn more about CIRP visit http://www.injurycenter.org.

Media Contact

Erin Pope EurekAlert!

Further information:

http://www.NationwideChildrens.org

All news from this category: Studies and Analyses

innovations-report maintains a wealth of in-depth studies and analyses from a variety of subject areas including business and finance, medicine and pharmacology, ecology and the environment, energy, communications and media, transportation, work, family and leisure.

Back to the Homepage

Comments (0)

Write comment

Latest posts

Seawater as an electrical cable !?

Wireless power transfers in the ocean For drones that can be stationed underwater for the adoption of ICT in mariculture. Associate professor Masaya Tamura, Kousuke Murai (who has completed the…

Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes

New probes allow scientists to see four-stranded DNA interacting with molecules inside living human cells, unravelling its role in cellular processes. DNA usually forms the classic double helix shape of…

A rift in the retina may help repair the optic nerve

In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the…

Partners & Sponsors

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close