New Research Set to Reveal Similarities Between Terrorists and Tourists

New research from the University of Warwick is set to reveal some striking similarities between the actions of groups of people who travel on flagship airlines, seemingly at random, between the major cities of the world. An ongoing research project into airlines and international tourism shows in many cases it is only motivation that distinguishes the terrorist from the tourist, and may be the cause of big headaches for the world’s national carriers.

What’s more failure to appreciate the fact that international terrorism and international tourism share as many similarities as they do differences would be a significant oversight.

Both tourism and terrorism involve citizens of different countries who visit internationally famous buildings, sites, hotels and shopping centres. Both tourists and terrorists frequently carry bags and back-packs, travel alone or in small groups, and the anonymity of both groups enables them to blend into their surroundings.

Further comparisons could also be made with other national carriers that operate across boarders.

Research by Dr Bridgette Sullivan-Taylor of Warwick Business School in the UK, funded by The Leverhulme Trust, into the strategic management implications of global terrorism builds on previous research carried out into international tourism conducted within the industry. She is set to investigate whether global terrorism has an impact on organizational learning in international service organizations.

The study will also examine how international service organisations cope with managing under the conditions of ongoing uncertainty and ambiguity posed by terrorist activities, and the affect of terrorism and security policy on international tourism patterns and flows, in particular comparing US and UK practices.

Previous studies have noted the reluctance of business travelers to change their plans to travel to high-risk destinations even in the light of adverse risk data emerging in the media. Non-business travelers behave in different ways, modifying their plans and destinations (Egypt suffered a 42% drop in tourism following terrorist attacks in 1992). For an airline that provides both business and leisure travel, these circumstances lead to complex planning and decision making.

This study will prove useful to government agencies and business organisations that are planning strategies in recognition of the changed international environment following 9/11.

Media Contact

Jenny Murray alfa

More Information:

http://www.warwick.ac.uk

All latest news from the category: Social Sciences

This area deals with the latest developments in the field of empirical and theoretical research as it relates to the structure and function of institutes and systems, their social interdependence and how such systems interact with individual behavior processes.

innovations-report offers informative reports and articles related to the social sciences field including demographic developments, family and career issues, geriatric research, conflict research, generational studies and criminology research.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

Creating good friction: Pitt engineers aim to make floors less slippery

Swanson School collaborators Kurt Beschorner and Tevis Jacobs will use a NIOSH award to measure floor-surface topography and create a predictive model of friction. Friction is the resistance to motion…

Synthetic tissue can repair hearts, muscles, and vocal cords

Scientists from McGill University develop new biomaterial for wound repair. Combining knowledge of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering, scientists from McGill University develop a biomaterial tough enough to repair the…

Constraining quantum measurement

The quantum world and our everyday world are very different places. In a publication that appeared as the “Editor’s Suggestion” in Physical Review A this week, UvA physicists Jasper van…

Partners & Sponsors