Process Engineering

This special field revolves around processes for modifying material properties (milling, cooling), composition (filtration, distillation) and type (oxidation, hydration).

Valuable information is available on a broad range of technologies including material separation, laser processes, measuring techniques and robot engineering in addition to testing methods and coating and materials analysis processes.

Movement of atoms viewed at 100 times higher than previous resolution

A paper published in Nature, by scientists at the Universities of Sheffield and Warwick and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, describes how experts have used X-rays to see structures in unprecedented detail at the atomic scale. The technique is 100 times more sensitive than any other method, and has the potential to allow scientists to improve things like data storage, healthcare sensors and security systems.

Prof Mike Gibbs, of the Department of Engineering Materials at the

Snow brings green machining to laboratory

University of California scientists working at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel machining technique that uses a jet of solid carbon dioxide (CO2) to cool/lubricate the surface of metal parts and remove the cut material during machining. Called Snow-Machining, the process could someday eliminate the use of oil-based or synthetic chemical fluids for metal cutting and metal parts cleaning in industry.

The Snow-Machining technology creates a high velocity stream

Space ‘eye’ for textiles

An artificial eye developed for Earth observation is now being employed to recognise colour variations in dyed fabrics: a critical element of textile production. This could significantly reduce the 160 million metres of dyed fabrics discarded annually in Europe with high environmental costs.

“Today most of Europe’s more than 40,000 textile companies rely on human quality control. Specialised personnel monitor fabrics as they are produced, but this is an expensive and techn

Oxygen sponge saves energy during the production of plastics

Dutch researcher Bart de Graaf has developed a solid oxygen carrier, a sort of oxygen sponge. The oxygen from the sponge reacts with hydrogen to produce water. With De Graaf’s discovery a lot of energy can be saved during the production of raw materials for plastics.

Hydrogen is released during the conversion of ethane and propane to ethylene and propylene, raw materials for the production of plastics. Using oxygen from a so-called oxygen sponge to convert hydrogen into

Innovative Profile Sensor for Measuring Turbulence

In order to carry out research on complex flow processes, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed a special sensor that can be used to measure turbulent jet flows.

Turbulence is one of the last phenomena in the field of physics which has is still not understood. However, the rapid development of computer simulations and experimental technology has led to a better understanding turbulence. Phenomena like reducing the turbulence of ships by using micro-bubbles, or increasing th

Development of environmentally friendly metal finishing process

The University of Leicester is playing a key part in a network of 33 companies and universities, set up to develop pioneering new processes for metal coatings which will offer benefits to a wide range of industries, including automotive and aerospace component manufacturers.

The network uses ionic liquid technology developed at the University of Leicester, exploited through its spin-out company, Scionix Ltd.

Companies and academics from 11 European countries have been brou

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