World’s largest robotic telescope ready for action

The Liverpool Telescope, the world’s largest fully robotic telescope, has snapped its first images of the heavens this week. This 2 meter optical telescope is owned by the Astrophysics Research Institute (ARI) of Liverpool John Moores University (JMU), but observes autonomously from its site on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The telescope was designed, constructed and commissioned by Telescope Technologies Ltd., a subsidiary company of JMU.

The Liverpool Telescope’s unique capabilities of flexible scheduling and rapid response will put the UK at the forefront of exciting new fields of research in time domain astrophysics. “This enables us to study such phenomena as supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts – the biggest explosions in space,” said Professor David Carter of the ARI. The telescope’s other great strength is its ability to make regular observations of objects that vary over periods from seconds to years. This is very difficult with current astronomical facilities. It can also track newly discovered objects such as comets or near-Earth asteroids, allowing accurate calculations of their paths and potential hazard.

The telescope is supported by the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, making 40% of the observing time available to astronomers throughout the UK. A further 5% of the time has been donated by JMU to the National Schools’ Observatory (NSO) programme. “School children can now work on their own projects alongside professional astronomers,” said Dr. Andy Newsam (NSO astronomer). This is the first time regular access has been granted to schools on world-class research telescopes.

Media Contact

Julia Maddock alfa

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.astro.livjm.ac.uk

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Key breakthrough towards on-site cancer diagnosis

No stain? No sweat: Terahertz waves can image early-stage breast cancer without staining. A team of researchers at Osaka University, in collaboration with the University of Bordeaux and the Bergonié…

A CNIO team describes how a virus can cause diabetes

It has recently been described that infection by some enteroviruses – a genus of viruses that commonly cause diseases of varying severity – could potentially trigger diabetes, although its direct…

Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus

UD research team looking at ways to destabilize virus, knock it out with antivirals. As the world grapples with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, another virus has been raging again in…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close