Latest News

Drop in found out

Air lets water droplets skim across the kitchen sink.

Scientists have found the answer to a question pondered over many a kitchen sink: why do little droplets skim across the surface of washing-up water rather than mix with it?

Yacine Amarouchene and colleagues at the University of Bordeaux in Talence, France have discovered that the height from which the drops fall has no effect on their lifespan 1 .

Soap, detergent – and indeed food grease – are ’

Bacteria make bandage glow

A microelectronic sensor may alert doctors to bacterial hazards.

Smart bandages could soon alert doctors to the presence of certain bacteria in a wound by glowing different colours. Researchers in the United States have created a tiny device that emits faint light of two colours in response to two types of bug 1 .

Benjamin Miller, of the University of Rochester in New York State, and colleagues hope that a refined sensor might ultimately generate an instant an

Wall-to-wall power

Solar cells printed like wallpaper.

Solar cells might one day be produced by the roll, as cheaply and easily as wallpaper. Scientists in Arizona are using screen-printing, a technique developed for patterning fabrics, to produce plastic solar cells 1 .

The technique is another step towards the general availability of solar power from flexible devices on plastic sheets or glass panels. The basic materials of a photovoltaic cell are inexpensive, but combining t

Genes show seasonal trends

Mosquitoes’ evolve rapidly in response to global warming.

Mosquitoes are holing up later as winters get warmer, US ecologists have shown. This is the first genetic adaptation to global warming to be identified. Less flexible animals could face extinction, they warn.

The North American mosquito Wyeomyia smithii uses shortening day length to judge when to bed down for the winter. Modern mozzies wait nine days more than their ancestors did in 1972, William Bradshaw and Christin

Gold Nanowires Grow on Their Own

Scientists can coax tiny metal particles to self-assemble into microscopic wires that conduct electricity and repair themselves, new research reveals. Kevin D. Hermanson of the University of Delaware and his colleagues, who published their finding in the current issue of Science, suggest that such nanowires may prove useful for wet electronic and bioelectric circuits.

The researchers placed particles of gold ranging in diameter from 15 to 30 nanometers in a fluid suspension within a thin ch

Salt holds samples of ancient seas

Water trapped for millions of years gives a glimpse of oceans’ turbulent past.

Drops of sea water entombed within salt crystals millions of years ago are giving researchers a glimpse of ancient oceans. The water, trapped during evaporation, reveals that the seas have seen large chemical changes during their history.

“The consensus had been that sea-water chemistry hadn’t changed that much over the past 600 million years,” says geochemist Juske Horita of Oak Ridge National La

Page
1 17,082 17,083 17,084 17,085 17,086 17,094

Physics and Astronomy

A different kind of chaos

Physicists answer a decades-old question about interacting quantum particles in a disordered system. Physicists at UC Santa Barbara and the University of Maryland, and also at the University of Washington…

Webb, Hubble capture detailed views of DART impact

Two of NASA’s Great Observatories, the James Webb Space Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope, have captured views of a unique NASA experiment designed to intentionally smash a spacecraft into…

Focusing on complex waves

Extreme nonlinear wave group dynamics in directional wave states. Understanding the unpredictable behaviors of ocean waves can be a matter of survival for seafarers. Deep-water wave groups have been known…

Life Sciences and Chemistry

“Mystery gene” matures the skeleton of the cell

“I’m a professional pin-in-a-haystack seeker,” geneticist Thijn Brummelkamp responds when asked why he excels at tracking down proteins and genes that other people did not find, despite the fact that…

First-ever mycobiome atlas describes associations between cancers and fungi

Poorly understood compared to bacteria and viruses, the new work opens the door to using tell-tale fungi as a diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tool. An international team of scientists, co-led…

Combi-seq: a leap forward for personalized cancer therapy

Researchers have come up with a way to test the efficacy of hundreds of anticancer drug combinations – simultaneously, rapidly, and accurately. Each year, around 10 million lives around the…

Materials Sciences

Powerful Bragg reflector with ultrahigh refractive index metamaterial

We all look in the mirror at least once a day to see our reflection. Mirrors are used not only in daily life but also in cutting-edge technologies such as…

New upcycling system for commercial polyesters

Using commonly available materials and a simple mixing and heating process, polyesters can be transformed into highly recyclable, high-value materials. While plastics or synthetic polymers have many useful properties, their…

Researchers uncover how to 3D-print one of the strongest stainless steels

Insights revealed by a large particle accelerator lit a path forward. For airliners, cargo ships, nuclear power plants and other critical technologies, strength and durability are essential. This is why…

Information Technology

Neural net computing in water

Ionic circuit computes in an aqueous solution. Microprocessors in smartphones, computers, and data centers process information by manipulating electrons through solid semiconductors but our brains have a different system. They…

Full control of a six-qubit quantum processor in silicon

Researchers at QuTech—a collaboration between the Delft University of Technology and TNO—have engineered a record number of six, silicon-based, spin qubits in a fully interoperable array. Importantly, the qubits can…

Finding the ship that sent out a warning to The Titanic

New powerful technology reveals lost seabed structures. The ship which sent an iceberg warning to the RMS Titanic, before the ocean-liner sank, has been identified lying in the Irish Sea….