Latest News

Jefferson Lab experiments shed light on proton spin mystery

It’s a conundrum that’s confounded the curious for several decades. In the past, some called it a crisis. More recently, it’s come to be known as a puzzle: a mystery that has occupied the minds of thousands of researchers worldwide.

Call it the Case of the Missing Spin. A mathematical property of all subatomic particles, including quarks, spin is roughly equivalent to the physical rotation of an object in the macroscopic world.

Physicists have long wondered how the

Jefferson Lab free-electron laser upgrade could induce completely new phenomena in materials

What questions will it answer; what opportunities will it offer?

History doesn’t record the moment when fully conscious humans asked the first question. The incessant push of human curiosity has nevertheless changed the world. Even so, despite the seemingly inexorable march of science and technology into the current century, questions don’t seem in short supply. Gwyn Williams, basic research program manager for Jefferson Lab’s Free-Electron Laser (FEL), suspects some im

Life sciences: the European Commission stimulates debate with the Science Generation project

The Science Generation project which European research commissioner Philippe Busquin is presenting in Brussels today aims to make decision-makers, politicians and scientists, as well as the general public, better informed on action to be taken at the interface between life sciences and society. This project, receiving €1.44 million in EU funding, seeks to set up networks of scientists, students and journalists, extending into the regions, with colloquia and public opinion surveys and debates online

Students discover new species of spider

As film buffs queue to watch the new Spider-man movie, geography students from the University of Sussex have gone one better by discovering a new species of spider in the wild.

The second year undergraduates were taking part in a field course to the Seychelles, one of the most biologically diverse places on the planet. As part of this trip the students were responsible for helping to set insect traps in the Vallée de Mai, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on Praslin, the second-largest island in

Geologist’s Discovery May Unlock Secrets to Start of Life on Earth

Scientist continues to build case for origin of plate tectonics

A Saint Louis University geologist has unearthed further evidence in his mounting case that shifting of the continents — and perhaps life on Earth — began much earlier than many scientists believe.

Tim Kusky, a professor of Earth and atmospheric sciences, has discovered the world’s first large intact pieces of oceanic mantle from the planet’s earliest period, the Archean. The nearly mile-long section of rock,

Ames Laboratory puts the "squeeze" on communications technology

New parallel library allows maximum performance for communication networks

A new message-passing library that makes it possible to extract optimum performance from both workstation and personal computer clusters, as well as from large massively parallel supercomputers has been developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory. The new library, called MP_Lite, supports and enhances the basic capabilities that most software programs require to communicate bet

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Physics and Astronomy

Could space dust help protect the earth from climate change?

On a cold winter day, the warmth of the sun is welcome. Yet as humanity emits more greenhouse gases, the Earth’s atmosphere traps more and more of the sun’s energy,…

Universalities at the glass transition

In a recently published article in the leading physics journal “Nature Physics”, a team of researchers with the participation of the University of Augsburg reports about unexpectedly universal correlations between…

‘Engine’ of luminous merging galaxies pinpointed for the first time

Roughly 500 million light-years away, near the constellation Delphinus, two galaxies are colliding. Known as merging galaxy IIZw096, this luminous phenomenon is obscured by cosmic dust, but researchers first identified…

Life Sciences and Chemistry

Antarctica’s ocean brightens clouds

Gases from phytoplankton in the ocean help form dense clouds that reflect sunlight. The teeming life in the Southern Ocean, which encircles Antarctica, contributes to brightening the clouds that form…

Penguin physics…

… understanding the mechanisms of underwater turning maneuvers in penguins. Penguins constitute a fascinating family of flightless birds that, although somewhat clumsy on land, are extremely talented swimmers. Their incredible…

New horizons for organoboron and organosilicon chemistry

…with triple elementalization. In recent years, organic chemicals containing boron (B) and silicon (Si) have found applications in various fields, including optoelectronics and pharmaceuticals. Moreover, they can also serve as…

Materials Sciences

Bioresorbable membrane for healing internal and external wounds

Fraunhofer researchers have succeeded in using the bioresorbable silica gel Renacer® to produce an electrospun membrane that is neither cytotoxic to cells nor genotoxic. This model mimics fibrous structures found…

How to make hydrogels more injectable

A new computational framework could help researchers design granular hydrogels to repair or replace diseased tissues. Gel-like materials that can be injected into the body hold great potential to heal…

Powering wearable technology with MXene textile supercapacitor ‘patch’

Drexel researchers create 6V textile supercapacitor to power wearable technology. Researchers at Drexel University are one step closer to making wearable textile technology a reality. Recently published in the Royal…

Information Technology

Toward practical quantum optics: multiphoton qubits from LNOI

New research demonstrates feasibility of photon-number doubling with a lithium-niobate-on-insulator (LNOI) platform. Can quantum optics be used for practical applications? A lot depends on whether a large number of photons…

Solving a machine-learning mystery

A new study shows how large language models like GPT-3 can learn a new task from just a few examples, without the need for any new training data. Large language…

Quantum-safe identities for a digital future

The security of digital identities is threatened by future quantum technologies. In the hands of attackers, quantum computers will be able to break classical encryption methods. To fend off such…