Saving Cells – Safer Method for Filtering Sensitive Biological Products

For many years, engineers have worked to efficiently filter valuable bio-process products on an industrial economic scale. The challenge has been to push rates up without incurring high shear rates and resultant cell lysis, which would cause loss of yield. High shear can destroy delicate and valuable biological materials such as proteins, blood, algae and yeasts, and also brings with it a requirement for higher flow rates, which in turn raises pumping costs.

Inventors at the University of Oxford have developed two very elegant solutions to this dilemma, each of which would allow bio-process engineers to “have their cake and eat it” – i.e. achieve high flux AND low shear. Both technologies are improvements upon the existing practice of using ceramic block or tubular membrane filters, allowing users to obtain breakthrough performance without incurring massive disruption.

The first method is an insert that could be applied to existing tubular membrane filters (TMF) as an add-on. It can be used to achieve excellent mixing at low rates of flow and with a laminar flow pattern. This combination helps to minimise cell damage in the filtration of sensitive materials as high filtration fluxes are obtained at much lower feed flow rates than are currently achieved using existing equipment. The method has been successfully used for ultrafiltration of protein solutions with high flux and negligable fouling; separation of plasma from whole blood by microfiltration and separation of high concentration yeast suspensions. All of these important processes can be achieved more effectively at a much lower cost if the insert method is adopted.

The second method or “Helical Groove” ceramic block membrane filter would be a suitable replacement for an existing ceramic block filter element. Normally the performance of these filters is limited by the efficiency of fluid mixing. The helically grooved internal structure of the new membrane allows optimisation of radial mixing as the surface area of the filter is increased. The inherent properties of the filters are also important and include excellent chemical and thermal stability and rigidity. From a practical point of view they are easy to sterilise and can be easily adapted for use in large-scale units.

The inventions are now the subject of granted patents and a ten-tube microfiltration module is available for demonstration purposes. Companies interested in developing these systems for commercial applications should contact Isis Innovation Ltd.

Media Contact

Kim Bruty alfa

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.isis-innovation.com

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Pitt researchers create nanoscale slalom course for electrons

Professors from the Department of Physics and Astronomy have created a serpentine path for electrons. A research team led by professors from the Department of Physics and Astronomy have created…

Novel haplotype-led approach to increase the precision of wheat breeding

Wheat researchers at the John Innes Centre are pioneering a new technique that promises to improve gene discovery for the globally important crop. Crop breeding involves assembling desired combinations of…

A microscope for everyone

Jena researchers develop open-source optical toolbox. The open-source system from the 3D printer delivers high-resolution images like commercial microscopes at hundreds of times the price. Modern microscopes used for biological…

Partners

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close