Fever enzyme identified

A specific enzyme that is a central part in the regulation of body temperature has been identified by a research team at Linkoping University, Sweden. The enzyme is a potential target in the development of new and selective fever reducing drugs.

Professor Anders Blomqvist, MD David Engblom and co-authors are publishing their findings in Nature Neuroscience.

Fever is caused when small, easily diffusible molecules known as prostaglandin E2 are bonded to receptors on deep neural structures and change the brain’s thermostat. However, the prostaglandins are not produced until the specific enzyme mPGES-1 signal an ongoing inflammation somewhere in the body.

By using genetically modified mice the researchers found evidence of this function. A group of mice lacking the gene for mPGES-1 were injected with a bacterial extraction. The same injection was given to a group of wild-type mice. The result was a consistent elevation of body temperature in the wild-type group, while modified mice remained feverless.

Analyzing the content of prostaglandin E2 in the brain confirmed the result.

– The fever reducing drugs used today inhibit the formation of a wide range of substances, which explains most of side-effects such as gastritis, kidney disease and cardio-vascular symptoms. If you can aim directly at the enzyme mPGES-1 you will get a more specific effect, says Anders Blomqvist.

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