U.Va. researchers discover mechanism for the regulation of low-voltage-activated calcium channels

Researchers at the University of Virginia Health System have defined a molecular mechanism by which the activity of low-voltage-activated calcium channels can be decreased. Low-voltage-activated, T-type calcium channels are found in many types of tissue and alterations in their activity can contribute to several pathological conditions, including congestive heart failure, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy and neuropathic pain. The findings will be published in the July 10 edition of Nature. The team led by Paula Q. Barrett, professor of pharmacology and principle investigator of the study, found that G-protein beta gamma subunits, a class of cell membrane proteins that mediate the actions of hormones within the cell, markedly decrease the flow of calcium through these channels into the cell interior. Because elevation of calcium within cells stimulates cellular activity, regulation of calcium entry is an important way by which the function of cells can be controlled. The research uncovered that only one member of a large family of G-protein subunits binds directly to the calcium channel protein to inhibit channel activity.

“These studies identify the T-type calcium channel as a new target for G-protein beta gamma subunits,” Barrett said. “The extraordinary specificity of the interaction between these regulatory molecules could be operative in many types of cells and provides exciting insight into the highly selective ways in which cells work. Knowledge of these interactions will lead to the development of new and more specific drugs in the future.”

Joshua T. Wolfe, a graduate student whose work is supported by the American Heart Association, conducted much of the work for this research. Support for the research also came from the National Institutes of Health and the University of Virginia Cardiovascular Research Center.

Media Contact

Abena Foreman-Trice EurekAlert!

Weitere Informationen:

http://hsc.virginia.edu/news

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Cyanobacteria: Small Candidates …

… as Great Hopes for Medicine and Biotechnology In the coming years, scientists at the Chair of Technical Biochemistry at TU Dresden will work on the genomic investigation of previously…

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional…

Big-hearted corvids

Social life as a driving factor of birds’ generosity. Ravens, crows, magpies and their relatives are known for their exceptional intelligence, which allows them to solve complex problems, use tools…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close