New spin out company offers solution for chemicals industry problem

A new company is helping to solve a 20-year problem in the chemicals industry.

Enviresearch, a Newcastle University ‘spin-out’, uses computer models to determine whether chemicals are environmentally friendly.

The British Government demands that chemicals undergo a rigorous testing programme, including an ‘environmental risk assessment’, before it is satisfied a substance is safe. Only then will it grant a sales licence for the UK and Europe.

Due to these strict regulations, however, which date back to 1981, there is a massive backlog of tens of thousands of chemicals which need checking.

Risk assessments can be based on laboratory tests, or performed using the cheaper, quicker method offered by Enviresearch. Computer modelling provides results in several days, as opposed to the several weeks needed for laboratory tests to be completed.

Company director James Garratt has been working on environmental modelling and research for the last decade.

He said: “We are currently able to test a wide range of chemicals, including pesticides, paints, detergents and wood preservatives for our clients using a wide range of mathematical models.”

“The models – sophisticated computer programmes – carry out a detailed analysis of information we have about particular chemicals and predicts what would happen if they enter the environment. The worst case scenario is that a harmful chemical could kill birds and fish and damage the ecosystem.”

Dr Garratt, a researcher with Newcastle University’s School of Biology, is targeting the international chemicals industry with this technology. One recent project involved helping a company to predict how the acidity
of soil would affect the risk that a pesticide would contaminate drinking
water.

“There is certainly plenty of work out there, with the backlog of chemicals needing to be environmentally risk assessed,” he added.

Media Contact

Claire Jordan alfa

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Scientists solve big limitation of stratospheric balloon payloads

How do you cool a large telescope to absolute zero while flying it from a huge balloon at 130,000 feet? Nearly all photons emitted after the Big Bang are now…

Pumping a nanoparticle to lase at low power

A single nanoparticle can act like a laser at low power but still emit a sharp signal. Lasers are used in a range of everyday devices, harnessing the power of…

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in water

A new polymer-based, solid-state transistor can more sensitively detect a weed killer in drinking water than existing hydrogel-based fluorescence sensor chips. The details were published in Chemistry-A European Journal. The…

Partners

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close