International Science Grid This Week celebrates one year

A collaboration between Open Science Grid in the U.S. and Enabling Grids for E-sciencE in Europe, iSGTW promotes the success of grid computing as a tool for scientists and researchers.

Able to complete in minutes what might take an average PC many months, grid computing offers scientists a new level of computing power, allowing them to delve deeper in to research questions with big answers. Grid computing works by coordinating the power of ordinary computing resources, linking this power into massive multifunctional computing “grids.”

“Scientists are using grid computing to fight disease, develop new semiconductors and study the origins of the universe,” said Open Science Grid Executive Director Ruth Pordes. “We’re proud to support a newsletter that shares the exciting scientific breakthroughs that grid computing makes possible.”

“Grid computing is about more than computers,” said Bob Jones, Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project director. “Grids can only work where there is cooperation and collaboration, between countries and between people. Efforts such as iSGTW only reinforce this integration, showing the close ties within the global grid community.”

International Science Grid This Week is jointly funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science through the Open Science Grid; and by the European Commission’s Information Society and Media Directorate-General through the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project.

Media Contact

Sarah Purcell alfa

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.isgtw.org

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Here you can find a summary of innovations in the fields of information and data processing and up-to-date developments on IT equipment and hardware.

This area covers topics such as IT services, IT architectures, IT management and telecommunications.

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