Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Reading speed harnessed to automatically control text display rates

03.03.2015

Reading a text is something that each of us does at our own individual pace. This simple fact has been exploited by computer scientists in Saarbrücken who have developed a software system that recognizes how fast a text on a display screen is being read and then allows the text to scroll forward line by line at the right speed. The technology makes use of commercially available eye-tracking glasses, which are able to capture the motion of the user’s eyes and convert this into a reading speed. Potential future areas of applications include electronic books or the large-scale displays used in railway stations and shopping centres.

The research team will be showcasing its project from March 16th to March 20th at the Cebit computer expo in Hanover (Stand E13, Hall 9).


Computer scientists in Saarbrücken have developed a software system that recognizes how fast a text is being read and then allows the text to scroll forward line by line at the right speed.

Credits: Oliver Dietze

Average readers manage about 200 words per minute. Once they reach the end of a page in a book, they turn the page. Things are somewhat different when reading a text on a display. In this case, the reader might use the mouse to pull up the next section of text to be read. This is something the team of computer scientists from Saarland University and the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) would like to change.

Their solution is based on the movement of the reader’s eyes. The system analyses the reading speed and uses the result to automatically adjust the speed at which the text is displayed on the screen. ‘We use commercially available eye-tracking glasses,’ explains Christian Lander, a doctoral research student who works at the DFKI’s Innovative Retail Laboratory and is supervised by Professor Antonio Krüger.

The glasses are equipped with two cameras: a small infrared camera that faces the user and tracks the movement of the pupil in the user’s right eye. The other camera faces forward and records the image that the user is looking at. The software combines the images from the two cameras and is thus able to precisely determine the direction of eye gaze.

‘We have combined the image capture technology with a computational procedure that we developed in the media informatics research seminar,’ says Lander. ‘It computes the average speed at which a paragraph is read. The method involves registering how quickly the reader’s eye travels from left to right along a line of text and then downward to the next line.’ The system recognizes any change in the reader’s reading speed and adjusts the text scrolling speed accordingly.

The system currently allows three readers to simultaneously read the same text on a single display. ‘Each reader has their own small window in which they can read the text at their preferred speed,’ explains Lander. It is conceivable that in a few years’ time this technology will be used on the sorts of large displays found in railway stations or shopping centres.

At the moment, tracking glasses are needed in order to register the wearer’s gaze. However, the system could be installed in future in other more user-friendly wearable devices such as Google Glass. The method can also be adapted for use on smaller displays or with electronic books.

Computer science and informatics at Saarland University

The Department of Computer Science forms the core of the informatics landscape at Saarland University. A further seven internationally renowned research institutes are located in the immediate vicinity on campus. As well as the two Max Planck Institutes for Informatics and for Software Systems, the Saarbrücken campus is also home to the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, the Intel Visual Computing Institute, the Center for IT-Security, Privacy and Accountability (CISPA) and the Cluster of Excellence ‘Multimodal Computing and Interaction’.

Christian Lander is one of 370 doctoral research students currently studying at the Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science.

Questions can be addressed to:
Christian Lander
Innovative Retail Laboratory (IRL) / DFKI
E-mail: christian.lander(at)dfki.de
Tel.: +49 (0)681 85775-5009

Editor:
Gordon Bolduan
Science Communication
KIS – Computer Science Competence Center Saarland
Tel: +49 (0)681 302-70741
E-mail: bolduan(at)mmci.uni-saarland.de

Note for radio journalists: Studio-quality telephone interviews can be conducted with researchers at Saarland University using broadcast audio IP codec technology (IP direct dial or via the ARD node 106813020001). Interview requests should be addressed to the university’s Press and Public Relations Office (+49 (0)681 302-2601).

Melanie Löw | Universität des Saarlandes
Further information:
http://www.uni-saarland.de

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai
15.06.2018 | DECHEMA Gesellschaft für Chemische Technik und Biotechnologie e.V.

nachricht Insects supply chitin as a raw material for the textile industry
05.06.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Grenzflächen- und Bioverfahrenstechnik IGB

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Machine-learning predicted a superhard and high-energy-density tungsten nitride

18.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences

Why might reading make myopic?

18.07.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>