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Kiel nano research at the Hannover Messe

21.04.2017

Minuscule details with a massive impact: For the first time the research focus Kiel Nano, Surface and Interface Science (KiNSIS) of Kiel University (CAU) will show at the Hannover Messe how cutting-edge research from Kiel produces a range of potential applications for industry. Together with the three other research focus areas at the CAU, KiNSIS will show examples of nanoscience and surface research from the Kiel laboratories in Hall 2, "Research & Technology". Lectures on current research topics complement the programme from 24 to 28 April 2017.

From intelligent materials for the future through to optimised medical technology and new procedures for surface processing: through interdisciplinary cooperation between physics, chemistry, engineering and life sciences, the research focus KiNSIS creates molecular machines and surfaces which gain entirely new properties due to their nano structures.


Organic light-emitting diodes are already familiar from smartphones or big-screen televisions. Other applications which are made possible by the flat emitter surfaces, such as illuminated wallpaper or use in highly-integrated optical sensors, will be presented in a lecture on 27 April.

Photo/Copyright: Jan Balke

Using exhibits and lectures, the Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs) and working groups of the research focus will demonstrate the diversity of Kiel’s nano research, and its potential applications for industry. Items to be presented include, amongst others, highly-sensitive magnetic field sensors, switchable molecules as a safe medical contrast agent, adhesive materials inspired by nature, smart surfaces incorporating organic LEDs and process plasmas in nano-technology.

"Without fundamental research at universities there is no innovation. Examples from our research focus KiNSIS show how we bring current research to industry. This is especially fostered by the interdisciplinary environment at Kiel University," said Rainer Adelung, co-spokesperson for the research focus and professor of functional nanomaterials.

Scientists at the associated working group have recently developed a new procedure for treating surfaces, which will also be presented at the KiNSIS booth. For the first time, this allows metals to be permanently connected with almost all materials, also polymers.

"The trend is towards customised objects, which are manufactured individually in a 3D-printer, such as biocompatible implants for medical technology," continued the materials scientist. "So we need technologies that can print not only plastics, but also metals and ceramics. And material that can be processed accordingly." Developing these composite materials for Industry 4.0 is just one of the topics which scientists of the research focus KiNSIS are currently working on.

The CAU booth is in Hall 2, C07.

Lectures by the KiNSIS research focus:
24.4.2017, 11 am, lecture: “Stuck in the north: smart surfaces for walking on the ceiling”, Dr. Lars Heepe
25.4.2017, 11:30 am, lecture: “Materials for Industry 4.0 join what does not belong together: from aluminium & Teflon to copper & silicone", Prof. Rainer Adelung
26.4.2017, 11:30 am & 1 pm, lecture: "Process plasmas in nano-technology", Professor Holger Kersten
27.4.2017, 11:30 am, lecture: “OLEDs in functional devices: more than just a display technology", Matthias Bremer

Photos are available to download:
http://www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-115-1.jpg
Caption: Plasma jets are used in various areas of application for surface processing, whether it is for disinfection, bleaching of teeth or coating processes. A lecture on 26 April will explain the role of process plasmas in nano-technology.
Photo/Copyright: Julia isekmann, Kiel University

http://www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-115-2.jpg
Caption: Organic light-emitting diodes are already familiar from smartphones or big-screen televisions. Other applications which are made possible by the flat emitter surfaces, such as illuminated wallpaper or use in highly-integrated optical sensors, will be presented in a lecture on 27 April.
Photo/Copyright: Jan Balke

http://www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-115-3.jpg
Caption: This intelligent adhesive material can be made to bend and stretch using a UV light. This allows tiny objects to be positioned and transported precisely, which makes applications in robotics possible. The surface of the material was developed based on the model of beetle feet. A lecture on 24 April will present similar examples from the field of bionics.
Photo/Copyright: Emre Kizilkan

http://www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-115-4.jpg
Caption: Adhesive bonds between metal and plastic do not normally hold. However, with a new etching process for surfaces, metals can be bonded with almost all materials on a permanent basis. In addition, they become water-repellent through this process, and thus gain "built-in corrosion protection". The process will be presented in a lecture on 25 April.
Photo/Copyright: Julia Siekmann, Kiel University

http://www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-115-5.jpg
Caption: Switchable molecules, as investigated in CRC 677, offer numerous fields of application, from self-toning glasses to magnetic switches, right through to contrast agents in the field of medicine. If switchable contrast agents are injected into the body, they can be activated by green light, and then deactivate over time. Operations can be carried out more safely and over longer periods. Photo/Copyright: SFB 677

http://www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-115-6.jpg
Caption: Highly-sensitive magnetic field sensors measure extremely small magnetic fields. The sensors from the CRC 1261 will be used in future for detecting biomagnetic fields, such as in the brain or the heart. A mechanical wave is generated on the surface of the sensor which changes under the influence of the magnetic field. Photo/Copyright: SFB 1261

Contact:
Julia Siekmann
Communication KiNSIS
Tel.: +49 431 880 4855
jsiekmann@uv.uni-kiel.de

Details, which are only a millionth of a millimetre in size: This is what the research focus "Kiel Nano, Surface and Interface Science – KiNSIS" at Kiel University has been working on. In the nano-cosmos, different laws prevail than in the macroscopic world - those of quantum physics. Through intensive, interdisciplinary cooperation between materials science, chemistry, physics, biology, electrical engineering, computer science, food technology and various branches of medicine, the research focus aims to understand the systems in this dimension and to implement the findings in an application-oriented manner. Molecular machines, innovative sensors, bionic materials, quantum computers, advanced therapies and much more could be the result. More information at http://www.kinsis.uni-kiel.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse/de/ausstellung/kiel-nano-surface-and-interf... Exhibits by the KiNSIS research focus
http://www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse/de Exhibits by the KiNSIS research focus
http://www.hannovermesse.de/aussteller/christian-albrechts-universitaet-zu-kiel/...

Dr. Boris Pawlowski | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

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