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Fraunhofer FHR to Showcase Non-contact, Non-destructive Quality Control of Plastic Products at the K 2019

17.10.2019

At the K 2019, the world’s leading trade fair for the plastics and rubber industry in Düsseldorf from October 16 – 23, the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques FHR will demonstrate the broad range of applications of its SAMMI® millimeter wave scanner in the plastics sector. With their trade fair presentation, the scientists will demonstrate the diverse possibilities of millimeter wave technology for the non-contact, non-destructive inspection of plastic products.

Millimeter waves are capable of penetrating non-conductive materials, so-called dielec-trics. Thus, they are particularly suitable for the use in quality control and quality as-surance for plastics. The experts from Fraunhofer FHR will show what this means in concrete terms at the joint Fraunhofer booth SC 01 in hall 7.


The millimeter wave scanner SAMMI® allows for the non-contact, non-destructive inspection of plastics with regard to contaminations, air inclusions, internal structure, shape, density etc.

Fraunhofer FHR/Bellhäuser

They will put the millime-ter wave scanner SAMMI® to use to scan different plastic products, inspecting them for contaminations, air inclusions, internal structure, shape, density, homogeneity, and much more.

A striking example is the inspection of 3D printed components, as the quality control and quality assurance for these components will become increasingly relevant in the future in light of the rapid development of the 3D printing area.

In addition, the visitors of the K 2019 will also have the opportunity to examine their own samples up to a size of 300 x 300 x 50 mm with the demonstrator.

Using high frequency techniques, SAMMI® is capable of scanning plastics that are not transparent in the optical range. At the same time, even the smallest of differences in the material are made visible.

Systems based on millimeter wave technology allow for the scanning of plastic products on a sample basis or through the integration into production lines to inspect them without ionizing radiation. In doing so, SAMMI® offers non-contact, non-destructive testing in real-time.

As an imaging desktop device, the demonstrator runs with a 90 GHz CW system in a scanning area of 290 x 290 mm. The scanning duration is ≤ 60 seconds, depending on the desired quality, while the contrast and color values of the amplitude and phase measurements can be adjusted in real-time.

“Millimeter wave technology offers a diverse range of applications and customized solutions, especially for the plastics sector and its demands. We are excited to present SAMMI® in action in the top-class international specialist environment of the K 2019”, says Daniel Behrendt, Business Unit Spokesman Production at Fraunhofer FHR.

For more information on our trade show presentations and the exhibits, please visit:
https://www.fhr.fraunhofer.de/en/events/2019/k-messe-2019.html

For more information on the K 2019, please visit:
https://www.k-online.com

Jens Fiege | Fraunhofer-Institut für Hochfrequenzphysik und Radartechnik FHR

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