Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tracking our lives and times

02.07.2007
LIVES and loves, friends and family, parents and partners, getting together and breaking up - the whole sweep of human relationships from the cradle to the grave will be explored in a major new study led by the University of Leeds.

For five years, the Timescapes study will track 400 ordinary people, building up a valuable database about their lives and their relationships. It will look at their key experiences such as growing up, forming relationships, bearing and rearing children, living in families and getting old.

The research, funded by a £4.5 million grant from the Economic and Social Research Council, is led by Dr Bren Neale of the University's School of Sociology and Social Policy. She said: "We will be exploring the important relationships by which people define themselves - how they live, for example, as sons or brothers, wives or grandmothers.

"We want to know how these relationships affect people's life chances and the major decisions they make. We will be tracking people to explore how these relationships are 'worked out' over time and how things change through the process of growing up and growing old.

"It will be like walking alongside people as their lives unfold."

Timescapes, which also involves researchers from London South Bank, Cardiff, Edinburgh and The Open University, is based on seven projects that span the life course: two on young lives, three on mid-life experiences, and two on older lives.

It will study a diverse mix of people: "Our participants will be from all walks of life, rich and poor, and from different ethnic and religious groups. They will live in varied communities across the UK and will be drawn from across the generations, including different generations within the same families," Neale explained.

"And because this is about ordinary, everyday lives, it has an appeal and a relevance to everyone. The ups and downs of life, the challenges that people face, the choices they make, will be immediately understandable."

The study will create a wealth of data - in-depth interviews, observations, photos, video and audio diaries - which will document changes as they occur and turn our 'snapshot' visions into a movie narrative of modern social life. The data will be drawn together to form the Timescapes Archive at the University of Leeds.

And Timescapes will be organic, growing long after the five-year study is complete, as more information is added to the database. "It will act as a magnet for further research, which will enrich the archive as it grows," said Neale.

As well as answering some of the key questions about modern life - how people craft their relationships, how they react to world events, how their decisions mirror wider social change - the data collected will also inform policy-making, particularly in the areas of health and social care.

And the Timescapes Archive will have a lasting value, as Neale explained: "This unique, specialist resource on the dynamic nature of personal lives and relationships will be of enduring value for future generations of researchers and social historians."

Jennifer Hicks | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht The competitive edge: Dietary competition played a key role in the evolution of early primates
01.08.2018 | Grand Valley State University

nachricht Diversity and education influence India’s population growth
31.07.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>