Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Early Life Key To Handling Dilemmas For UK’s Community Regeneration Workers

16.10.2006
Early life experiences help community regeneration professionals develop the commitment and resilience to balance complex ethical and emotional work challenges, according to a recent study published today by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

'Negotiating Ethical Dilemmas in Contested Communities' explores how professionals negotiate the conflicting interests and attitudes of local residents and institutional actors such as management and local politicians, whilst dealing with problems raised by greater 'managerialism' - the short-term targets, competition for funding and bureaucratic burdens the researchers associate with the government's 'modernisation agenda'.

The study - carried out by Professor Paul Hoggett and Dr Chris Miller from the University of West England and Professor Marj Mayo of Goldsmiths College -foregrounds the importance of community development activities in regeneration areas to government efforts to make citizens central to public service planning and delivery, and to deal with poverty and social exclusion.

Findings confirmed the challenging nature of such work in multiply disadvantaged communities, but found that workers' extraordinary levels of commitment and resilience - often deeply rooted in early life experiences and identifications - informed a strong sense of personal authority and a capacity for emotional and ethical complexity.

Professor Hoggett explained: "The fact that many of the sample group were themselves 'survivors' meant that they were able to cope with levels of conflict, tension and distress that others might find daunting."

Researchers were also struck by the mixture of compassion and anger that underlay the respondents' belief in democracy, community and social justice. These values were consistent and strong in the group, and contributed to significant overlap between people's 'personal' and 'professional' selves.

The study found that the aims of public service reform - with its stress on quick, tangible and measurable outputs - were not always in step with what respondents saw as the challenges of long-term development work. Most community regeneration professionals reacted to this dilemma with forms of 'strategic compliance' - for example, supporting longer-term priorities with funds from short-term initiatives. Researchers found complex relations between workers and authority, with Professor Hoggett commenting: "They are both 'in' and 'against' authority, and need a strong sense of personal authority."

Overall, the study found that managerialism brought greater detachment from the job for professionals and, whilst this had certain benefits, potential negative effects included the blocking out of social suffering in the public consciousness. Researchers considered it possible that workers whose political socialisation occurred in the 1970s expressed more concern about the impact of the government's 'modernisation agenda' on their work than more recent entrants to the profession.

The study also discovered there is a lack of support for workers, including significant gaps in opportunities for continuing professional development or non-managerial supervision. The study argues that policy makers and managers often fail to grasp the distinction between capacities and skills, and that this has important implications for the training and development of such workers. As a consequence of the study, however, 'practitioner forums' are now being established in Bristol and London, involving respondents and other local development workers.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Professor Paul Hoggett on 0117 328 2932/0117 909 8246 or Paul.Hoggett@uwe.ac.uk
Or Alexandra Saxon/Annika Howard at ESRC, on 01793 413032/413119
Email: alexandra.saxon@esrc.ac.uk / annika.howard@esrc.ac.uk

Annika Howard | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esrc.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht The competitive edge: Dietary competition played a key role in the evolution of early primates
01.08.2018 | Grand Valley State University

nachricht Diversity and education influence India’s population growth
31.07.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>