Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Regeneration schemes have done little to improve women's poverty

12.07.2006
New studies have found that women's poverty has been poorly addressed by national regeneration schemes, and that local labour markets in deprived communities are not working properly.

The studies, Addressing Women's Poverty: Local Labour Market Initiatives, and Connecting Women with the Labour Market, confirm that women are more likely than men to live in poverty. Although many women in low income households have a strong desire to work they face many barriers. A combination of low wage jobs and inadequate local services are holding them back. These women feel demoralised and overlooked.

Even in areas where there is major job growth, this is no guarantee that women's poverty will decline. The findings show that if the only accessible opportunities for women are in low paying sectors then concentrations of deprivation are likely to continue.

Professor Sue Yeandle, who directed the research programme at Sheffield Hallam University explains, "Although training courses for women in low income groups can be very successful, if progression into paid work is to follow, they need to give women personal support and to be job-focused. Our research also shows that good qualifications do not always lead to jobs for these women. In some localities, even well-qualified women were struggling to enter the job market.

"Our studies show that for women in deprived communities who want to work, pre-employment preparation, mentoring and funding for childcare is crucial. Schemes like Sure Start and Family Centres do meet these needs, but they are fairly small scale and the majority of women who would benefit don't have access. There is also a lack of support for women who don't have children, or whose children have grown up."

"Women's poverty is linked to both occupational segregation and the gender pay gap. Employment which offers a 'living wage' for entry level jobs, flexible working practices and job opportunities that offer real progression would all make a huge difference to the quality of life for women in low income households or living in deprived communities."

This study forms part of a larger research programme, The Gender and Employment in Local Labour Markets (GELLM) research programme, which was funded by a European Social Fund grant, with support from the Equal Opportunities Commission, the Trades Union Congress and twelve English local authorities where the research was undertaken. The findings will be presented at a major conference, Promoting Gender Equality in Local Labour Markets, at TUC Congress House on Thursday 13 July 2006, when the programme’s six new reports will be launched.

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index
07.11.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Because not only arguments count
30.10.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften (MPIMIS)

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

14.12.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

14.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet

14.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>