Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Flawed regulation leaves asylum seekers destitute says new research

11.01.2005


Many asylum seekers in Leeds are destitute or homeless because of flaws in the benefits system according to researchers at the University of Leeds. The project, which was funded by ESRC, reveals that forced migrants in the city are often denied benefits and accommodation because of the time constraints imposed by section 55 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act (2002), which is currently under review.



"The system simply isn’t working," says Dr Peter Dwyer, who led the research. "Successful asylum seekers often end up homeless because they are given only a short time to move from National Asylum Support (NASS) accommodation into mainstream social housing, which is in short supply."

The researchers found that the levels of social security benefits available to asylum seekers, currently worth 70% of income support, were set at levels that promote poverty and social exclusion. "What’s more, those who are denied asylum but are not sent home have no rights to welfare at all," says Peter Dwyer, "they simply disappear and the extent of destitution is hidden because of the clandestine nature of the problem. Individuals denied access to public support are increasingly having to rely on other migrants or charities."


Leeds is a particularly good site for a case study on welfare and forced migration because Yorkshire and Humberside has the highest regional population (20% of the UK total) of NASS accommodated asylum seekers. The year-long project examined the basic needs and coping strategies of 23 refugees and asylum seekers from nine countries, who had varying entitlement to benefits under current rules. The researchers also interviewed 11 people involved in the delivery of specialist welfare services.

Contrary to the image portrayed in some sections of the media, the findings reveal an overall picture where many forced migrants live in poverty and others experience poor housing and harassment from neighbours. One respondent described the leaking lavatories, collapsing ceiling and dangerous wiring in the home of a single woman asylum seeker with two babies. Another, whose application had been refused, said: "There is no way I can find money. In this country I’m not allowed to beg and I’m not allowed to work. I don’t even have accommodation to live in."

As a result of the data from the Leeds study, the researchers have called for a number of policy changes: <(p>
  • The government should end the use of section 55;
  • The benefits of asylum seekers on subsistence only benefits should be increased to the equivalent of 100% of income support;
  • NASS should ensure that all private housing contractors supply and maintain accommodation to a level that is fit for human habitation;
  • All housing contractors should record and respond effectively to incidents of racist harassment suffered by asylum seekers. This should include rapid rehousing for those who face physical violence and/or repeated abuse;
  • To combat homelessness, asylum seekers who receive a positive decision should have more time to switch from NASS to the mainstream welfare system.
  • Failed asylum seekers who are not returned by the government should be allowed to work or should receive adequate support as long as they remain in the UK.

Becky Gammon | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.esrc.ac.uk
http://www.leeds.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index
07.11.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Because not only arguments count
30.10.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften (MPIMIS)

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

16.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How the gut ‘talks’ to brown fat

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

15.11.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>