Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Casting the GeNet - £3million study into Gender Equality

12.08.2004


How do men and women in the UK work and live together in the 21st Century? How do they compare as children and how do parents shape their upbringing? What choices do we make academically, what are male and female attitudes towards family and relationships? How do men and women share childcare, and what career paths do they choose, or have forced upon them? And how do the two genders compare in retirement?

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has just awarded some of the country’s top social scientists £3 million to answer these and other questions that affect men and women and shape education, business, and public policies. Known as GeNet, this major gender studies project will be the most complete and comprehensive study of its kind.

The eight teams chosen to lead GeNet draw together experts in the social sciences, law and management from the universities of Cambridge, City, Essex, Oxford, London School of Economics (LSE), as well as the Institute of Education and the Open University. For the first time ever, they will share their diverse academic expertise to bring together an accurate picture of men and women’s working and domestic lives.



Policy experts, lawyers, economists and social scientists will not only examine gender differences in families, ethnic groups, and different classes, but take a broader look at how policy influences gender differences. Questions such as ’Is tackling gender inequality good for business?’, and ’Do gender policies help or hinder equality?’ will be examined.

The project, to be started in October 2004, and funded for five years, will be led by Dr Jackie Scott, a leading Cambridge sociologist:

"This is going to be a fascinating study, which will create a really strong factual understanding of gender equalities, what choices we make as adults, and how we shape our children’s lives in the UK at the start of the 21st Century. For a long time now, policy has focused on outdated models of male breadwinners, and stay at home mothers. Society is far more complex that that, but policies haven’t moved away from post-war ideas. The GeNet project will have a huge significance in terms of moving the knowledge into the world we are actually living in today, rather than the world that shaped our thinking last century. "

Press Office | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cam.ac.uk
http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/news/dp/2004072601

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index
07.11.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Because not only arguments count
30.10.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften (MPIMIS)

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

Im Focus: Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Physicists in the EPic Lab at University of Sussex make crucial development in global race to develop a portable atomic clock

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock - devices...

Im Focus: Sensing shakes

A new way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell...

Im Focus: A thermo-sensor for magnetic bits

New concept for energy-efficient data processing technology

Scientists of the Department of Physics at the University of Hamburg, Germany, detected the magnetic states of atoms on a surface using only heat. The...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Heading towards a tsunami of light

19.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Dalian Coherent Light Source reveals hydroxyl super rotors from water photochemistry

19.03.2019 | Life Sciences

From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants

19.03.2019 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>