Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

150 Grad Students Embark on Research in East Asia and Australia

22.06.2004


American students are happy to find jobs during the summer to help pay for their schooling. Others are more fortunate to be part of intern programs that prepare them for their eventual professional lives. For some others, however, the summer prospects are even more rewarding. How about an opportunity to construct carbon nanotubes in a Sydney, Australia laboratory? What about the chance to study with a molecular virologist in Taipei to search for a potential HIV cure? Or maybe do research based on a fossil fuel carbon emission model created in Seoul to better understand the effects of greenhouse gases?



The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) 2004 East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Program (EAPSI) for U.S. Graduate Students will offer just such opportunities for 150 advanced science and engineering students this summer in Australia, China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. NSF will support these students as they conduct research with foreign counterparts in fields such as cancer research, humanoid robotics, computational neuroscience and nanofabrication.

For example, Matthew Averill, a graduate student at the University of Texas at El Paso, will work on earthquake prediction with researchers at the University of Tokyo. Sarah Rothenberg from the University of California, Los Angeles, will work on modeling urban water demand at China’s Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources.


“This is the largest contingent of U.S. graduate student participants in the program’s 14-year history,” according to Larry Weber, who manages the EAPSI program. “These research experiences abroad offer exciting discovery opportunities for talented American science and engineering graduate students, and the program will enable them to have the skills necessary to operate in a competitive international research arena and global marketplace in the future.”

The institutes provide U.S. graduate students in science and engineering with first-hand research experiences in Australia, China, Japan, Korea or Taiwan, as well as an introduction to the culture and language of the region. The institutes also offer students first-hand knowledge of the research infrastructure and science policies of their international partners.

The summer institutes last approximately eight weeks from June to August. Each EAPSI awardee receives from NSF an international round-trip air ticket and a stipend of $3,000. Sponsoring organizations in these East Asia and the Pacific communities support students’ local living expenses.

NSF administers and manages the EAPSI program through its Office of International Science and Engineering. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) co-sponsor the summer institute in Japan.

Applications are being sought for the 2005 summer institutes. The deadline for submitting those applications is Dec. 10, 2004.

NSF | newswise
Further information:
http://www.nsf.gov
http://www.nsftokyo.org/spmenu.htm

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht A gene activated in infant and young brains determines learning capacity in adulthood
13.11.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf

nachricht The Maturation Pattern of the Hippocampus Drives Human Memory Deve
23.07.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

NASA keeps watch over space explosions

16.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>