Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Underwater laser cutting

22.10.2014

Underwater construction on offshore wind farms, bridges or locks must presently be done by scuba divers.

For maintenance and repair of metal constructions, a number of processes are available, but these are time consuming and difficult on the divers.


Underwater laser cutting is a fast and thus economical alternative to conventional processes.

Photo: LZH

For this reason, engineers at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and the Leibniz Universität Hannover (LUH) are developing a process for automated, underwater laser cutting.

At the moment, mainly light arc oxygen cutting is being used for underwater cutting. The electrodes are hand-guided. Depending on the material thickness, divers need a workday to cut 20 meters in material. For a diving period of five hours this means a cutting speed of only 7 centimeter per minute.

Cutting seven times faster

With a laser-based automated process, the cutting speed should be increased by a factor of seven. “During pilot tests, we have already achieved a cutting speed of 0.5 meters per minute for 10 millimeter thick steel” says Dr.-Ing. Jörg Hermsdorf, head of the Machines and Controls Group at the LZH.

“With this process, underwater metal working could be considerably faster and thus less expensive. Our goal is to make the work of the divers safer and more efficient.”

Efficient dismantling of sheet piling

The process is being developed for dismantling sheet pilings in two to six meters deep water. For this, it is crucial that the pilings including the interlocks are reliably cut, as post processing is time-consuming and expensive. Since metal part corrode under water and are subject to overgrowth, the process is supposed to function reliably, even for varying material thicknesses and pollution levels.

The finished process could also be used for the maintenance and repair of offshore structures and other hydraulic structures. Also, dismantling of nuclear power plants is a further field of application.

The project “Laser cutting under water for higher productivity – LuWaPro” is supported by the German Federation of Industrial Research Associations "Otto von Guericke" e.V. (AiF).

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.lzh.de/de/publikationen/pressemitteilungen/2014/laserschneiden-unter-... - website with press realease and additional video

Lena Bennefeld | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Copper oxide photocathodes: laser experiment reveals location of efficiency loss
10.05.2019 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

nachricht NIST research sparks new insights on laser welding
02.05.2019 | National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time

How long the battery of your phone or computer lasts depends on how many lithium ions can be stored in the battery's negative electrode material. If the battery runs out of these ions, it can't generate an electrical current to run a device and ultimately fails.

Materials with a higher lithium ion storage capacity are either too heavy or the wrong shape to replace graphite, the electrode material currently used in...

Im Focus: Stevens team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips

Photons interact on chip-based system with unprecedented efficiency

To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the...

Im Focus: Happy hour for time-resolved crystallography

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Hamburg and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) outstation in the city have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work. This method dramatically simplifies starting enzymatic reactions by mixing a cocktail of small amounts of liquids with protein crystals. Determination of the protein structures at different times after mixing can be assembled into a time-lapse sequence that shows the molecular foundations of biology.

The functions of biomolecules are determined by their motions and structural changes. Yet it is a formidable challenge to understand these dynamic motions.

Im Focus: Modular OLED light strips

At the International Symposium on Automotive Lighting 2019 (ISAL) in Darmstadt from September 23 to 25, 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, will present OLED light strips of any length with additional functionalities for the first time at booth no. 37.

Almost everyone is familiar with light strips for interior design. LED strips are available by the metre in DIY stores around the corner and are just as often...

Im Focus: Tomorrow´s coolants of choice

Scientists assess the potential of magnetic-cooling materials

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quality control in immune communication: Chaperones detect immature signaling molecules in the immune system

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

Moderately Common Plants Show Highest Relative Losses

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

The Fluid Fingerprint of Hurricanes

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>