Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Manufacturing technology: The vibration that smoothes

19.09.2011
Vibration-assisted milling can lead to higher-quality surfaces

In conventional milling operations, a workpiece on a table is typically fed past a rotating multi-tooth cutter, and the entire surface is processed by making a series of overlapping passes. This procedure, however, tends to leave unmilled remnants of material along the edges of the tool path, compromising the quality of the finished surface.

Jeong Hoon Ko and Kah Chuan Shaw at the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology in collaboration with colleagues at Nanyang Technological University have now shown that inducing ultrasonic vibration during high-speed milling of small metal products can lead to smoother, higher-quality surfaces1.

Vibration-assisted machining has been applied in the past, but mainly to turning or lathing applications, in which the spindle speed was much lower than the vibration frequency. Even when vibration assistance was applied experimentally in milling, the tool spindles turned far slower than the vibration. In contrast, Ko and his co-workers experimentally applied ultrasonic vibrations in a high-speed micromilling system where the rotation frequency of the cutter was much faster than the frequency of vibration.

The researchers established two different test rigs on which they could evaluate the effect of vibration assistance on the machined surfaces. They proceeded to run tests with and without vibrations, in line with and across the direction of the feed. They applied a wide range of spindle speeds and used tool paths with a confined width and depth.

Ko and his co-workers found that the height of the remnant material, called ‘cusp’, can be reduced by applying ultrasonic vibration during high-speed milling with narrow tool paths and removal depths of less than one millimeter, improving the quality of the milled surface considerably. The effect was greater when feed-directional vibration was applied to the material than when the vibration was applied across or perpendicular to the feed, which resulted in the formation of wavy burrs. By comparing and analyzing the feed and cross-feed directional effects using advanced simulations, more accurate recommendations for surface quality improvement could be made. The team also showed that the level of surface roughness is dependent on a combination of factors including feed rate and tool profile, in addition to vibration and tool speed.

“We want to devise a new design that can enhance machining quality by tuning the vibration assistance direction,” says Ko. “Furthermore, we will test novel implementations, including a multiple-cutting mechanism. There are potential commercial applications for precision engineering using our vibration scheme in the die/mold, biomedical and electronics industries.”

The A*STAR-affiliated researchers contributing to this research are from the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology

References

Ko, J. H., Shaw, K. C., Chua, H .K. & Lin, R. M. Cusp error reduction under high-speed micro/meso-scale milling with ultrasonic vibration assistance. International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing 12, 15–20 (2011).

Lee Swee Heng | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.a-star.edu.sg
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht New technology for ultra-smooth polymer films
28.06.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht Diamond watch components
18.06.2018 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

17.07.2018 | Information Technology

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier

17.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

The role of Sodium for the Enhancement of Solar Cells

17.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>