Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Laser materials processing: Tracking the contour

12.05.2011
The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT has developed a process monitoring system that can precisely measure the position and speed of the laser beam processing point on the surface.

This enables deviations from the set contour and speed to be minimized and the energy input to be stabilized.

In recent years the use of modern solid-state lasers has brought about a distinct increase in operational speed in laser materials processing. Whether with scanners or fixed optics, high speeds – as far as possible in various axes at the same time – have almost become the norm. But although the movement of the optic is precisely calculated, the position of the processing point can deviate from the planned contour. Help is at hand, thanks to a process monitoring system which precisely tracks the relative movement of workpiece and optic. It enables acceleration-related deviations from the set contour and speed to be measured exactly and the numerical control system to be adjusted accordingly.

Research scientists at the Fraunhofer ILT in Aachen have developed a camera-based system which analyzes the movements of the workpiece through the optical axis of the laser beam before or during processing. It does not matter whether a fixed or scanner optic is used – in both cases the system measures the movement of the processing point on the workpiece and documents deviations from the set contour during machine setup or operation.

The process monitoring system uses image sequence frequencies of up to 10 kHz. In various applications, contours have been measured with a processing speed of up to 10 m/min (fixed optic) and up to 15 m/s (scanner optic). The deviation from a reference system was less than 3 cm/min. At present the measured data are evaluated separately. Whilst the same technology does permit real-time measurement (there are no technical barriers to this), the accuracy class of this has not yet been completely specified.

The special design of the system means that it can be used in a very wide range of applications, including laser cutting and welding, soldering, drilling, ablation, microjoining, SLM and hardening. The various modes of operation are interesting both for system integrators and for end users. On the one hand, the system can track the processing point during machine setup, enabling the planned contour to be adjusted.

On the other hand, the system permits process control during actual operation. This means not only can the processing contour be adjusted, the laser output can also be controlled to ensure an even energy input at different laser spot speeds. That is a critical factor in particular when processing thin materials. As a result, existing processes can be optimized and new processes are made possible.

In addition to application tests, the specialists at the Fraunhofer ILT provide full support for integration of the process monitoring system in their customers’ systems. This includes calibration of the system and adaptation to the customer’s optical equipment.

The system will be presented at LASER World of Photonics in Munich from May 23 to 26, 2011, on the joint Fraunhofer booth (Hall C2, Booth 330).

Contacts at Fraunhofer ILT
Our experts will be pleased to assist if you have any questions:
Dipl.-Ing. Christoph Franz
Sensor Technology
Phone +49 241 8906-621
christoph.franz@ilt.fraunhofer.de
Dipl.-Ing. Peter Abels
Sensor Technology
Phone +49 241 8906-428
peter.abels@ilt.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT
Steinbachstrasse 15
52074 Aachen
Phone +49 241 8906-0
Fax +49 241 8906-121

Axel Bauer | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht New technology for ultra-smooth polymer films
28.06.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht Diamond watch components
18.06.2018 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>